Rain Reign

I finished a book today that I can hardly wait to share with my students and teachers at school. That book is Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin. It was released last week, and it’s already earned a spot on several must-read lists. I predict that this book will find a place on several award lists as well. It’s absolutely amazing, and this book should be included in every elementary and middle school library collection (at the very least).

In Rain Reign, we meet Rose Howard, a young girl who has been diagnosed with high-functioning autism (also known as Asperger’s Syndrome). Her voice shines on every page, and readers get a small glimpse of what life is like for Rose. Rain Reign is a must-read for anyone–especially educators and other caregivers–who have any interaction with high-functioning autistic children. I know I was able to see one of my students in the character of Rose, and this excellent book may have provided me with just a bit more understanding.

Fifth grader Rose Howard loves homonyms, prime numbers, rules, and her dog Rain (whose name has two homonyms). Rain is the one of the few gifts Rose’s father has ever given her, and their bond is a strong one. When nearly everyone else–including Rose’s father–gets irritated by Rose’s obsessions, Rain is always there to provide a comforting and calming presence.

Comfort and calm is something that Rose will sorely need in the days to come. Hurricane Susan is making a beeline for Rose’s small Massachusetts town, and her precious routines will be tossed to the winds. The power goes out, creeks turn into rivers, bridges are washed out, trees fall…and Rose’s father lets Rain out of the house without checking on her return.

When the storm finally passes through, Rose realizes that her dog is missing. Did she forget her way home in the horrible storm? Was she carried downstream by the powerful currents? Where is Rain? Rose doesn’t understand how her father could have let this happened, but she’s determined to find her beloved dog…even if that means letting go of her routines.

Rose searches high and low for Rain. She enlists the help of her uncle, her teachers, and even her classmates. Rose does everything humanly possible to find her dog, but how will she handle it when she finds more than she was looking for? Will her world be thrown into yet another storm, and how will Rose–a girl who needs routine and consistency–deal with the fallout? How will she handle the many changes to come? Read Rain Reign by the brilliant Ann M. Martin to find out.

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As soon as I return to school next week (I’m on fall break right now), I plan to hand this book over to my guidance counselor. (In addition to working with autistic students, she’s also a dog lover.) Several other teachers may also benefit from reading this book. I think Rain Reign could be unbelievably useful in communicating with and understanding autistic students.

In addition to being enlightening for educators and students, parents of high-functioning autistic children may also find this book to be helpful, especially if the parents don’t really know how to communicate with their children. Rose’s uncle provides an example of a good caregiver. Her father is the opposite. As a matter of fact, I wanted to punch Rose’s father in the face on more than one occasion.

Rain Reign is also a great book for students who have fondness for word and number play. This could even come into play in language arts or math lessons. Class studies of this book could include looking for homonyms that weren’t mentioned by Rose or finding prime numbers out in the “real world.” And don’t even get me started on how this book could be used to illustrate character’s voice. Read one chapter, and you’ll see that for yourself.

I don’t know that I’ve adequately conveyed it in this post, but I love everything about Rain Reign. It definitely tugged at the heartstrings (yes, I cried), but it taught valuable lessons. Rose was a brave girl who worked past her own issues when something was important to her. She tried to understand others even when it seemed like no one understood her. She always wanted to do the right thing and follow the rules…when it would have been much easier–and far less painful–to just “go with the flow.” Rose is a character, much like August Pullman in R.J. Palacio’s Wonder, who we’ll be talking about for a long time to come.

For more information on Rain Reign and other books by Ann M. Martin, go to her official website, Facebook, Goodreads, or Twitter.

*I receive an advance copy of this book through Goodreads First Reads.*

This Journal Belongs to Ratchet

This morning, I finished reading yet another of the nominated titles for this year’s South Carolina Children’s Book Award. The book was This Journal Belongs to Ratchet by Nancy J. Cavanaugh. As the title suggests, this book is written in a journal format, and each entry tells readers a little more about our main character, Ratchet. (Her real name is Rachel, but no one calls her that.)

If you’ve worked with elementary or middle grade readers, I likely don’t have to tell you how popular books in diary/journal format are. I can’t keep books like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Dork Diaries, Dear Dumb Diary, or even Dear America books on the shelves. These books are quick, entertaining reads that kids tend to devour. I predict that This Journal Belongs to Ratchet will be no different.

Ratchet is looking for her life to change. This lonely girl–who is homeschooled by her father–wants to make friends, be more like other girls, and finally have something new in her life. Ratchet is sure that having a mother would make everything different, but there’s not much she can do about that. (Her mother died when Ratchet was just a little girl.) Even so, Ratchet works to make things change…hopefully for the better.

Ratchet explores her feelings through a journal. Now, this journal is supposed to be for a homeschool language arts assignment, but Ratchet knows her dad will never read it, so she pours all of her feelings onto the pristine white pages. She uses her writing assignments–poetry, freewriting, descriptive essays, letters, and many others–to describe her frustrations with her father. His obsession with saving the environment and looking insane at every town hall meeting, his insistence on homeschooling Ratchet, never buying anything new, always needing her help in the garage, and his refusal to talk about her mom.

It’s not easy being the daughter of the town joke, and Ratchet hates feeling embarrassed all the time. (Her dad may not care what others think of him, but Ratchet does.) She loves her dad, but she longs for more in her life. Things would be so much better if she just had one real friend, but the kids in the neighborhood always make fun of Ratchet because of her dad…and because both of them are always covered in grease from working on cars.

Things may be on the verge of changing for Ratchet, though. When her dad begins teaching a class at the community center on how to build go-carts, Ratchet begins using the lessons her father taught her to get closer to the boys in the class. They really seem to value her knowledge, and Ratchet feels good about helping them. In the process, she even makes a close friend, Hunter, a boy who used to be part of the crowd that teased her so much.

As Ratchet explores her life, her relationship with her dad, and her feelings about her new friendship, she gradually realizes that maybe it’s not so important to be “normal.” Maybe her dad has been teaching her the important things in life all along. Sure, he’s a little crazy sometimes–and he often makes her mad–but he fights for the things he believes in, he’s true to himself, and, most importantly, he’s always been there for Ratchet. Perhaps her dad isn’t so crazy after all.

Maybe what Ratchet really needs to change in her life is her own perspective. When she realizes just how lucky she actually is, she can do anything she sets her mind to.

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I often tell my students that normal is boring. Well, Ratchet is anything but boring. I don’t know of many kids who can rebuild an engine, change a tire, teach others to build their own go-carts, and be motivated enough to do school work without any help. Ratchet is a fascinating character, and I think many readers will find her journey of self-discovery inspiring and enlightening. I also believe that readers who see themselves as kind of different will see a kindred spirit in Ratchet. And who knows? Her story could even inspire young readers–particularly girls–to learn more about auto mechanics.

I think This Journal Belongs to Ratchet could be a very powerful teaching tool in elementary and middle grade language arts classes. I envision classes reading this book together and then writing in their own journals. Students could take Ratchet’s example, and write their own poems, essays, letters, and even modern-day fairy tales, using their own lives as inspiration.

All in all, I’m very happy that this book was chosen as a 14-15 SCCBA nominee. It’s an entertaining, thought-provoking book that could help readers explore their own difficulties, frustrations, and even victories through writing. I hope the students and teachers in my school feel the same.

This Journal Belongs to Ratchet is the first book by author Nancy J. Cavanaugh. To learn more about this author and future books, visit her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

Buzz Kill

I first became a fan of Beth Fantaskey’s work a few years ago when I read Jessica’s Guide to Dating on the Dark Side. Since then, I’ve read a few other works by Fantaskey: Jessica Rules the Dark Side, Jekel Loves Hyde, and The Wedding of Antanasia Jessica Packwood and Lucius Valeriu Vladescu (a short story published on the author’s website). So, when Goodreads gave me the chance to read an ARC of this author’s latest novel, Buzz Kill, I was pretty stoked. I’m happy to say that the book lived up to my expectations.

Unlike Fantaskey’s other stories, this newest read has no supernatural elements, but it does introduce us to a strong, relatable, female protagonist. In Buzz Kill, readers meet Millie Ostermeyer, a seventeen-year-old who eats like a trucker, is the only member of her school’s Philosophy Club, wears ironic t-shirts that nobody gets, and has a somewhat loose relationship with rules and authority. She’s also an award-winning reporter for her school newspaper, and, while on what should be a routine assignment covering the new football stadium, Millie becomes embroiled in a story that will rock her entire world…

Nobody really liked the Stingers’ head football coach, Hollerin’ Hank Killdare, but who could have wanted him dead? That’s a question Millie wants answered after she discovers his body under the football stadium…especially when it’s made clear that her dad, the town’s mayor and the assistant football coach, tops the list of suspects.

Millie is sure that her dad didn’t do this (even if he has been acting kind of strange lately), so she goes on a quest to find the identity of the real killer. Plenty of people had reason to kill the coach, but who really did it? Was it Millie’s arch-nemesis, Vivienne Fitch, the cheerleader who was embarrased on YouTube, thanks largely to Coach Killdare? Was it Mike, Viv’s lackey, who lost his position as quarterback with the coach brought in a ringer? Could it even be the new quarterback himself, Chase Albright, a boy with a murky past who tends to keep to himself? Who could have committed this heinous crime, and can Millie figure things out before the murderer strikes again?

As Millie unleashes her inner Nancy Drew, she’ll find an unlikely ally in Chase. He’s still a total mystery, but it seems he knew Coach Killdare better than most, and he can give Millie access to the coach’s house, the school locker room, and other areas that would otherwise be off-limits (not that anything would have stopped Millie with or without Chase’s help). Chase may be the key in proving that her dad is not the killer everyone thinks he is.

But why does Chase want to help Millie? Why was the coach so important to him? Chase is most certainly hiding something, and, along with her quest to solve a murder mystery, Millie is determined to solve the mystery that is Chase Albright. She may not, however, be prepared for what she finds.

Millie and Chase are growing closer and closer to uncovering the truth…and they’re also growing closer to each other. Can either of them handle a relationship when everything around them is going crazy? Especially when things are about to get even more insane? There’s a killer on the loose, and, as Millie starts to put the pieces of this puzzle together, she may be this maniac’s next target. What would Nancy Drew do? Millie will have to answer this question and many more if she hopes to get out of this mess alive…

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I found Buzz Kill to be a thoroughly entertaining read. In addition to the murder mystery that kept me guessing for quite a while, I was also enthralled by the character of Millie. I think many readers will be able to see themselves in this character. She speaks before thinking sometimes, she dresses in what’s comfortable, she’s awkward around guys she likes, and she’s tortured by a mean girl. (Actually, “mean” doesn’t quite fit the evil Vivienne. The words I’d use to describe her would make a sailor blush. She’s vile, and a host of curse words went through my mind every time she made an appearance.) Millie questions rules that don’t make sense to her, she doesn’t understand why she should learn French, and she has a complicated relationship with her dad. Who can’t relate to at least some of that?

I also found Chase’s character to be intriguing. (See, I’m relating to Millie right now!) He was mysterious from the instant we saw him, and he remained something of an enigma for most of the book. Even when his secrets were revealed, there was still an aura of mystery about him. I think that’s part of what made him so attractive to Millie. Of course, his good looks and impressive vocabulary didn’t hurt either.

There were so many dynamic, well-developed characters in this book. I wanted to punch many of them in the face (even Millie on occasion). So many characters were butt-heads, in fact, that I didn’t know which one I wanted to be the killer. Like Millie, I waffled on who could have committed the crime, and, also like Millie, I didn’t figure things out until the very end. I’d say both of us were surprised by the way things turned out, and I think that’s the mark of a good mystery novel.

If you’re looking for a murder mystery with a liberal dose of humor, wit, and a touch of romance, I strongly urge you to give Buzz Kill a try.  It’s due to hit stores on May 6th, and I think it will be a big hit with middle grade, teen, and adult readers.

For more information on Buzz Kill and author Beth Fantaskey, visit the author’s website, Facebook page, Goodreads page, and Twitter feed.

Skinny

I’m not quite sure how I feel about my latest read, Skinny by Ibi Kaslik. I’m not even sure I would have considered reading this book if it had not been on sale…or if my book club wasn’t reading green books this month (books with green covers, “green” in the title, or by authors with the last name Green…you know, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day). With a green popsicle on the cover, I kind of expected Skinny to be sort of lighthearted. Boy, was I ever wrong.

Skinny is told from the perspectives of two sisters.  Giselle, a former medical student, is struggling with anorexia and quite a few other problems. Holly, an eighth grade athlete, is watching her sister, who used to be so strong, totally self-destruct.  Both girls are dealing with very different memories of their deceased father, relationships with guys, and the general business of living. Holly seems to want to help Giselle, but how do you help someone who is so bent on ruining her own life?

The character of Giselle is at once sympathetic and repellent. The reader wants her to turn her life around because she has so much potential, but it’s not easy to even read about someone who doesn’t want to help herself.  One minute it looks like she’s making a turn for the better; the next, she’s returning to her same old patterns. And soon, those patterns will manifest in Giselle’s entire body breaking down.

Holly, the younger sister, has her own issues. She’s partially deaf, she’s prone to acts of spontaneous stupidity, and she crushes on her sister’s boyfriend. But when you see what she has to deal with at home, Holly’s actions at least make a little bit of sense. She’s worried about her sister, but she’s also still a girl focused on her own life…which is going through a rough patch at the moment.

As the story progresses, and we get to know Giselle and Holly a little more, the reader roots for things to change. It doesn’t quite happen, though. This story is not a delightful romp through the park.  There is no happy ending or magical cure for the many issues plaguing Giselle or those who have to watch her downward spiral. As a matter of fact, I found much of the book to be depressing, and only occasionally did I even crack a smile while reading. But that’s okay. This book deals with some pretty serious issues, so it follows that the general tone of the book is serious as well.

Did I get what I expected when I started reading Skinny? Absolutely not. Did I like the book as a whole? Some of it. It was an interesting story, but it was a little hard to follow at times.  I don’t know if that’s because it was hard to nail down an exact setting through much of the book or because Giselle’s thought processes were so scattered.  (I honestly don’t know if the problem was with the character of Giselle or with the author’s writing.) Several times while reading, I asked myself, “What is the purpose of that word or sentence?” Some things just didn’t make sense to me. Maybe I’m alone in that, but I had to reread some passages a couple of times, and things still didn’t become clear.

I do appreciate that this book didn’t have a happy ending. That may seem weird, but, when you’re dealing with issues as serious as eating disorders and everything that results, sometimes happy endings just aren’t realistic. Anorexia takes a toll on the body, and we definitely see that in Skinny. Giselle wasn’t the only one to suffer because of her illness, though. Those around her did as well, and I imagine that many readers with similar experiences will relate to the pain depicted in this book.

Despite the age of Holly’s character, Skinny, in my opinion, is not a book that belongs in the hands of middle grade readers. (Some may be able to handle it but not many.) Much of the content (drugs, sex, drinking, etc.) is for mature audiences, so I would recommend this for high school students who have some modicum of maturity.

The Comeback Season

A couple of days ago, I finished reading The Comeback Season by Jennifer E. Smith.  (If that name rings a bell, it’s probably because she also wrote The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight…which I reviewed in March of this year.)  As a baseball fan, I was intrigued with the idea of a love story that essentially centered on a baseball team—even one that I’m not crazy about.  (The Chicago Cubs are featured in this book.  I’m a life-long Atlanta Braves fan.  Sadly, fans of both teams have grown accustomed to disappointment.)

Anyhoo, I was prepared for a light, fun read with lots of sports metaphors and a couple growing closer through their love of the game.  In one sense, I got what I was expecting.  In another, however, I got so much more.  The Comeback Season is much more than a love story.  Yes, there’s a tale of young love, but it’s also a book about moving forward and surviving…even when all hope is seemingly lost.

Ryan Walsh loves the Chicago Cubs.  It’s something she shared with her dad.  She loves the Cubs so much that she’s skipping school to catch opening day at Wrigley Field…on the tenth anniversary of her dad’s death.  (She’ll probably have more fun there anyway, even if the Cubs lose as they so often do, and even if this day brings back some pretty painful memories.  School is not exactly a good experience for Ryan.)  She doesn’t know what to think, though, when she runs into Nick, the new kid in school, also trying to score a ticket to watch the Cubs play.  Sadly, neither Ryan nor Nick gets a ticket to the game, but they do strike up a tentative friendship based on their mutual love for the Chicago Cubs.

When Ryan returns to school the next morning, she’s not quite sure how to act around Nick.  Are they school friends or baseball friends?  Will he be like every other person in school—even people Ryan once considered friends—and act like she’s invisible?  Much to Ryan’s surprise, Nick acknowledges her existence and seems to not care that she’s an outcast.  Their mutual love for the Cubs—and the hope that the team will have a good year—brings them together like nothing else could.

There may be something else, though, with the power to tear Ryan and Nick apart.  Something that neither of them knows how to fight.  Something that makes them question everything they’ve ever known or hoped for.  Nick is hiding a big secret, and when Ryan discovers what’s going on, she begins to lose faith in everything…including the baseball team that’s carried her through some of her toughest moments.

Ryan doesn’t think the Cubs will be enough this time, and she doesn’t know how to deal with the turmoil that is sure to come.  Ryan is losing the hope that is a part of every Cubs fan’s world, and she’s not sure how to get it back…or if she can, especially when it becomes clear that Nick—her only friend in the world and the boy who’s stolen her heart—is about to face something much more difficult than a baseball game.  Will this be a losing season for Ryan and Nick, or will they be able to come back from the biggest slump either of them has ever faced?  Read The Comeback Season by Jennifer E. Smith to learn how true Cubs fans hold onto hope even in the toughest of times.

I did enjoy this book, even though I was less than thrilled with the ending.  I hate to say this, but The Comeback Season reminded me a little of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars (probably the best book I’ve read so far this year).  I didn’t like this because, even at the beginning of this book, I had a feeling that I knew what was coming…and how I was going to react to it.  (I was right.)  Now, The Comeback Season, in my opinion, wasn’t nearly as good as The Fault in Our Stars, but the trials of at least one of the characters were similar to what happened in TFiOS.  Do with that what you will.

For more information on The Comeback Season and other books by Jennifer E. Smith, visit her website at http://www.jenniferesmith.com/, or follow her on Twitter @JenESmith.

Lola and the Boy Next Door

Before I begin telling you about Stephanie Perkins’ Lola and the Boy Next Door, I must urge you to read the amazing Anna and the French Kiss.  A couple of notable characters from Anna appear in Lola’s story, and it might be helpful–but not totally necessary–to read about their story before diving into Lola’s.  And, honestly, Anna and the French Kiss is a funny, romantic, beautiful novel that you really need to read anyway.  So do that.  Now.

Moving on to Lola…I loved everything about this book.  It’s got it all:  quirky, memorable characters, teen angst and drama, humor, and, most importantly, a love story that readers can really root for.  I also enjoyed that, unlike many other YA novels, Lola’s parents had a presence in her life.  They had rules they expected her to follow (which she didn’t always do, of course), and, in my opinion, Lola respected her parents and wanted their respect in return.  That was a nice change of pace from what I normally read.

Lola Nolan is a true individual. She dreams of being a fashion designer, and she sees clothing as a way to really express herself.  Lola’s appearance may change from day to day, but some things will always stay the same.  She will always be a loyal daughter, friend, and girlfriend.  She loves her dads, she supports her best friend, and she’s devoted to her boyfriend, Max.  In fact, she and Max (who is much older than her) have big plans for the future.  She’ll design fabulous costumes, and Max will enjoy success as a rock star.  All the while, love will keep them together.  (Anyone else have a Captain and Tennille song playing in their heads right now?)

Well, as you know, plans have a way of unraveling…especially when Lola’s first love–the boy who broke her young heart–moves back into the house next door and makes it clear he’s never forgotten Lola.

Cricket Bell was the first boy Lola ever loved, and, now that he’s back in town, Lola must face him, the past, and the rather confusing feelings Cricket inspires.  Can Lola and Cricket put the past behind them and be friends (even though one–or both–of them wants more)?  If they can be friends, how will Lola explain this relationship to Max, the boyfriend who’s been the center of her life for months?

Lola is becoming more conflicted by the minute.  She and Cricket are closer than ever, and it’s clear that there are strong feelings on both sides.  But Lola is still with Max.  Max, an older guy her parents and friends hate, a guy who’s not always nice or there for Lola, a guy who may not be as perfect as Lola once thought.  Will Lola wake up and see what’s obvious to everyone else in the world?  Will she give the boy next door the chance to be the boy that captures her heart?  Read Lola and the Boy Next Door to find out!

This book is an absolutely perfect example of young adult romance.  Stephanie Perkins has captured the very essence of young love and the drama that goes along with it.  Lola, like most teenage girls, is confused yet determined to go her own way, and she wants to be loved by those closest to her…and sometimes she makes things more difficult than they need to be.  I think we can all relate.

I’ll admit that Lola takes second place when it comes to my favorite character in this book.  I fell in love with Cricket Bell (and I think most readers will, too).  He is the perfect guy–not brooding or moody like most guys in YA novels–and he’s my new standard for, well, everything.  Move over Edward Cullen.  Cricket Bell has just taken your place.

If you’d like to read some truly stellar love stories, you must check out both Anna and the French Kiss and Lola and the Boy Next Door.  We can also look forward to another book to join these two, Isla and the Happily Ever After, due out in the fall of 2012.

For more information on author Stephanie Perkins and her wonderful books, visit http://stephanieperkins.com/index.html.  You won’t be disappointed.

Crescendo

Warning!  Read Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick before proceeding.  Don’t say I didn’t warn you! 

In April of this year, I read an amazing book.  (Actually, I read several amazing books in April, but that’s beside the point.)  The book I’m talking about is Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick.  It had everything–bad boys, forbidden love, fallen angels, mystery and intrigue.  It was awesome, so I was stoked to find out that it was the first book in a trilogy (as so many of them are these days).  Well, I finally finished reading the second book in this series, Crescendo, a few minutes ago.  While I like Hush, Hush better, I think Crescendo is still a great book.  I think it’s a typical second book in a series in that it serves as a bridge between the first and third books.  It set up a lot of what will happen at the end of the series, but it still had enough going on to keep readers interested in what the characters are currently up to.  A couple of new characters were introduced, but they only added to the mystery surrounding our main characters.  I’m definitely interested to see how the author will conclude this series, especially since Crescendo ended with such a cliff-hanger.  Now, on with the show…

In Crescendo, readers return to the world of Nora Grey.  After a harrowing experience, she’s trying to get on with her life, and a big part of that is her boyfriend and guardian angel, Patch.  Things aren’t exactly perfect, though.  Patch seems to be putting distance between himself and Nora.  He’s even spending time with Nora’s worst enemy, Marcie Millar.  What is going on?  Nora doesn’t really know, but she’s sure something’s going on, so she and Patch go their separate ways for a while…sort of.

As if Nora’s tumultuous relationship with Patch wasn’t enough to throw her for a loop, she’s also got to take chemistry in summer school (with the hated Marcie as her lab partner); an old family friend is back in town, and he’s got secrets of his own; Nora’s best friend is now dating Patch’s best friend, Rixon (a fallen angel); she’s confronted with more and more secrets that Patch may be keeping from her; and Nora is continuously haunted by the mysterious death of her father.  How can she deal with all of this, especially without Patch by her side?  How is everything connected?  Most importantly, who really killed her father, and can Nora stop this mysterious figure before she’s next?  Fall into the mystery when you read Crescendo by Becca Fitzpatrick.

There’s a lot going on in this book, and sometimes it’s hard to keep things straight, especially if it’s been over six months since you read the first book in the series.  I would definitely recommend reading (or rereading) Hush, Hush immediately before starting Crescendo.  I had to go back to Hush, Hush a couple of times to refresh my memory of what happened, and I know I’ll have to do the same thing when the third book, Tempest, comes out.  It won’t be released until the fall of 2011, so we’ve got quite a wait ahead of us.  In the meantime, I encourage you to visit Becca Fitzpatrick’s website at http://beccafitzpatrick.com/index.html to learn more about this author and her wonderful books.  Enjoy!

Published in: on November 28, 2010 at 5:28 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Gone

Gone is the final book in Lisa McMann’s Wake trilogy.  If you’re unfamiliar with these books, I encourage you to check out the previous two books, Wake and Fade, before reading Gone.  This is definitely a series that requires you to read each book in order since the stories build upon each other.  If you’d like more information on Wake and Fade, please look for my previous blog posts on those books.

In Gone, Janie is continuing her struggles with being a dreamcatcher.  She thinks the only options in her life are total isolation or living in the real world but dealing with being blind and crippled by her late twenties.  Janie doesn’t know what to do.  She wants to stay with Cabel, her boyfriend, but she doesn’t want to burden him with everything happening to her, and she’s tired of being drawn into his increasingly disturbing dreams.  Janie is beginning to think her only choice is withdrawing from society completely.

Janie’s world undergoes yet another shift when her father enters the picture.  She’s never met the man and didn’t even know his name until she discovered he was in the hospital.  When she visits him, she is immediately sucked into some seriously disturbing dreams.  She tries to help her father in his dreams, but how can she help him when the experience is so painful for her?  And what do his dreams even mean?

As the story progresses, Janie is faced with some major decisions, and her father’s illness adds yet another twist to a life that, whatever she decides, will be filled with more pressure than one teenage girl is prepared to handle.  What will Janie do?  Will she choose isolation and spare herself the trauma of being drawn into others’ dreams?  Or will she choose to be with her friends and face an uncertain future filled with dreams, nightmares, and eventual blindness and inability to take care of herself?  What would you do?  Read Gone, the final installment in the Wake trilogy, to find out how Janie decides to cope with her “gift.”

Even though the language in this series was a bit too strong for me, I thought the books were good, fast reads with interesting storylines.  I am happy to see it wrapped up in Gone even though the ending is not really nice and neat.  I think these books are great for anyone who wants to read about dreams or about both the ups and downs of having, for lack of a better word, superpowers.  Are superpowers gifts or curses?  You decide.

Published in: on March 13, 2010 at 10:47 pm  Comments (2)  
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Kitty Kitty

First of all, if you haven’t read Michele Jaffe’s Bad Kitty, you need to read it immediately.  It is one of the funniest books I have ever read.  That being said, I just finished reading Kitty Kitty.  (It should be obvious from the way I started this post that this is the sequel to Bad Kitty.)  While it did have it’s laugh-out-loud moments, I thought Bad Kitty was the better book.

In Kitty Kitty, Jasmine and her family (Dadzilla and Sherri!), have moved to Venice, Italy.  Jas has been taken from her friends and her super-hot boyfriend Jack (and she is sure he’s being bombarded with super-hot girls in her absence).  Jas becomes friends with a weird girl named Arabella who eventually ends up dead.  Chaos ensues as Jasmine tries to find out what really happened.  Jas is joined in her quest by the Evil Hench Twins and her friends Polly, Roxy, and Tom (who fly to Venice with Menudo…because that’s how everyone gets to Venice).

Anyone who reads Kitty Kitty, or even Bad Kitty, definitely has to suspend reality.  But don’t we all need to do that sometimes?  I know I do.  If you want to laugh or say to yourself, “What the…,” you need to read Michele Jaffe’s Bad Kitty and Kitty Kitty.  And judging by the way Kitty Kitty ended (don’t ask because I’m not telling), we can surely expect more adventures from Jasmine and her band of weirdos.  Enjoy!

Published in: on October 28, 2008 at 9:42 pm  Leave a Comment  
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