Gone Girl

*Normally, I post on middle grade and YA lit on this blog. That is not the case today. Gone Girl is definitely intended for an adult audience. You’ve been warned!*

At about 1am this morning, I finished reading Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Like a couple of other books I read this year, Gone Girl was a bit of a departure for me. It definitely falls within the realm of an adult book. (By “adult,” I don’t mean, you know, pornographic or anything–although there is some use of graphic scenes and language. I simply mean that this book is written for adults to enjoy…and even “enjoy” may not be an adequate word here.) I picked up this book because so many people–people I trust to lead me to good books–said it was worth the read. They were not wrong.

I guess we can classify Gone Girl as a psychological thriller. I definitely kept me guessing and thinking “What the #$%&!” for much of the book. I’m used to books where there is definitely a good guy and a clear villian. Not so in this read. In fact, I’m pretty sure I’m not alone when I say that both main characters are fairly despicable. At the beginning of the book, I didn’t feel that way, but I was definitely swayed later on.

I think what is so entertaining–if that’s the right word–about Gone Girl is the glimpse into a truly psychotic, codependent relationship. It’s not like the give-and-take between Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. No, Nick and Amy (the main characters in this book), make the Holmes-Watson relationship look positively healthy. Nick and Amy truly have a love-hate relationship…and their definitions of “love” kind of make me deliriously happy that I’m single.

Gone Girl is told from both Nick’s and Amy’s viewpoints, and the book centers around Amy going missing. Like most cases of missing wives, Nick, her husband, is almost immediately the prime suspect. In his story, we see a picture of a husband who has grown disinterested in his marriage, a man who lies freely, and someone who brings suspicion on himself.

In Amy’s story, at least in the beginning, readers get a glimpse into how she was led to the point of  being afraid of her seemingly perfect husband. Is that really the whole picture, though? As you may have guessed, it most definitely is not. In later chapters, Amy is revealed to be a conniving, manipulative–and altogether brilliant–psycho hose beast. (She makes James Moriarty look like a freakin’ teddy bear.) Seriously. This woman is batcrap crazy. And as more of Amy’s twisted mind is revealed to both Nick and readers, the clearer it becomes that Nick will never escape from this horror of a marriage…but does he really want to?

I don’t really know how I feel about the journey this book took me on. Part of me wanted at least one person to get a happy ending…but a bigger part realizes that there really wasn’t anyone in the book–apart from maybe Nick’s sister–who really deserved one. It’s rare that I read a book where I don’t like any of the characters but I still enjoy the book. That’s what happened in Gone Girl, though. It was a dizzying read at times, but the roller coaster–with all its twists and turns–was pretty thrilling.

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2 comments on “Gone Girl

  1. I’ve been wanting to read this…perhaps 2014 is the year to make it happen! 🙂

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