Perfect Lies

Warning! Read Kiersten White’s Mind Games and Annie and Fia (an ebook novella) before proceeding. You will be all kinds of confused if you don’t! (Of course, if you’ve come this far in this particular series, you’re probably already confused.)

I don’t quite know what to say about my latest read. Perfect Lies is the sequel to Mind Games by Kiersten White, which I read just three short months ago. I wish I’d read these two books back to back. Maybe that would have alleviated some of my initial confusion.  Even with a fairly short time span between reading Mind Games and Perfect Lies, it took me longer than I would have liked to re-familiarize myself with the characters and the story line (which is complicated enough without having to remember details).

If you’ve read Mind Games, you know that the basic story revolves around two sisters: Fia, a fighter with seemingly perfect instincts, and Annie, a blind Seer who has visions of the future. Both girls have been controlled by the Keane Corporation (really bad place with a worse leader who seeks to keep girls with special abilities in his power and debt), and they are trying–in different ways–to take control of their own destinies.

That’s kind of where Perfect Lies picks up.  Annie and Fia have been separated. Annie, who most believe to be dead by her sister’s hand, is with a group of people working against Keane from the outside. Fia, however, is working against Keane from the inside…with the help of James, Phillip Keane’s son and potential successor.

Perfect Lies is told from the perspectives of both sisters, but their stories are told–at least at first–in different time periods. It’s easy to see, though, from the notes at the beginning of each chapter–Three Months Before, Twenty-Eight Hours Before–that both perspectives are leading up to one huge event.  It’s not always clear what that event will be or how Annie and Fia will make their ways to it. As a matter of fact, I don’t think I figured things out until very late in the book. (Odd for me, but kudos to Kiersten White for keeping me guessing!)

Like Mind Games, Perfect Lies really messed with my head. In addition to not knowing what the characters would do from one minute to the next, being inside Fia’s head was sometimes jarring. In order to confuse the Readers (mind-readers) around her, her thoughts were often chaotic, and that definitely comes across in the text. I also wanted Fia to wake up and really see the people around her and how they were either helping or hurting her already damaged psyche. The same could be said for Annie, but I think Annie dealt with the people around her in a much more positive way than Fia did. Of course, Annie didn’t have to deal with always being the protector or, you know, a hired assassin. That was Fia’s job.

It was interesting to see how the sisters’ stories came together at the end and how they resolved what could have turned into total devastation. (It was bad enough, but it could have been much, much worse.) What I found interesting was that it wasn’t Fia who ultimately saved the day. It was Annie, the sister who nearly everyone saw as weaker and disabled. That, in my opinion, is awesome and sends a message that strength comes in many forms. No one, no matter how weak he/she appears to be, should ever be counted out. That’s something I need to remember in my own life.

Now that this short series is over, I have to say that I did enjoy it. It was quite the mind trip, and I’m messed up enough to admit that I like that. If you are drawn to books that are kind of out there, I highly recommend both Mind Games and Perfect Lies. Just give them a try!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s