The Crown of Ptolemy

Notice: Read everything Rick Riordan has ever written before proceeding. Seriously.

So, last night, I finally made time to read the third Percy Jackson/Kane Chronicles crossover novella, The Crown of Ptolemy. (For some reason, I didn’t post on the first two. Read them anyway. They’re awesome.) This story takes place after all of the action in The Blood of Olympus and The Serpent’s Shadow, and it’s told from Percy Jackson’s point of view…which basically means it’s full of sarcasm and snark.

The Crown of Ptolemy begins with Percy and Annabeth encountering some weird flying serpents on Governor’s Island in New York. These pests are hovering around Setne, an Elvis look-alike and Egyptian magician who’s trying to combine Greek and Egyptian magic in order to make himself immortal. Should be easy enough to stop, right? Yeah…not so much. Nothing ever seems to be easy when ancient magic is involved.

Percy and Annabeth call on Carter and Sadie Kane to help out with this mess before things get out of hand. Well, things kind of get out of hand anyway. Setne is on his way to uniting the two crowns of Egypt, becoming a god, and taking over the entire world.

The fearsome foursome of Percy, Annabeth, Carter, and Sadie must combine forces if they have any hope of stopping Setne. They’ll need to use every tool at their disposal–and some they didn’t even realize existed–to defeat Setne and prevent him from ripping the world apart.

Can Greek demigods and Egyptian magicians work together to stop this crazed madman? What unpleasantness will they encounter along the way? Find out for yourself when you read The Crown of Ptolemy!

_______________

I love that this story was written from Percy’s perspective. Even when things got super-serious, he greeted the situation with his trademark humor and snark. Percy’s voice is so refreshing, and I really hope that we’ll see more of him in future books, novellas, whatever.

I also enjoyed the interactions between the four characters in this story. Percy and Sadie found kindred spirits in each other, and the same was true of Carter and Annabeth. Impulsive rule-breakers vs. methodical rule-followers. Each of them had their own way of doing things, but every member of this group, boys and girls, contributed equally (in my opinion) in their quest to defeat Setne, and that in itself was kind of magical.

Given how this particular story ended, I have high hopes that readers will see more crossover stories from Percy, Annabeth, the Kanes, and even the other heroes in Riordan’s books (both past and future). It seems the lines between all of these “mythologies” may be blurring, and I’m thinking that everyone may need to work together to battle what’s coming.

For those of you who, like me, are kind of obsessed with Rick Riordan‘s work, never fear! There are a couple of his books coming out soon. Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes will be out on August 18th (and that reminds me that I still need to read Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods). The Sword of Summer, the first book in the Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard series, will be released on October 6th. And I haven’t even mentioned the graphic novel adaptations of Riordan’s books! This should keep us busy!

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