The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland

Thanks to my Amazon Prime membership (which is worth every penny I pay for it), I got to read my latest book a bit early. It was a Kindle First title for November, and I’m so glad I picked it. The book is The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland, and it will be released to the masses on December 1st.

The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland is being marketed as a YA romance, but it’s so much more than that. I would even say that the romantic stuff is secondary–even tertiary–to the other happenings in the book. At its core, I think this enthralling story is about coming to terms with one’s own brokenness and learning to open up and accept help when it’s needed.

Zander Osborne does not belong at Camp Padua. She’s here because her parents signed her up–or, more accurately, don’t know what to do with her. Zander may have her own secrets and problems, but she’s definitely not as crazy as the other campers around her, especially her cabin-mate, Cassie, an abrasive girl who’s also a self-diagnosed bipolar anorexic.

As days pass, Zander continues to keep her issues to herself, but she also forms connections with some other campers. There’s Grover Cleveland (not to be confused with the president), a charming guy who fears he will one day become schizophrenic like his dad. There’s also Bek, (short for Alex Trebek), who’s an extremely likable compulsive liar. Zander even forms an unlikely, tenuous bond with Cassie, who is dealing with much more than depression and an eating disorder.

Being part of this group helps Zander in ways that no share-apy sessions ever could. She’s finally feeling and caring about something again, and she finds herself opening up, divulging her most agonizing secrets, and wanting to find some measure of happiness. And maybe, just maybe, that happiness can be found in the arms of Grover Cleveland, a boy who fears his own future while Zander is dealing with her past.

Before Zander can be truly happy, though, she’ll have to confront some painful demons, both her own and those of her new friends. Can she accept the help she needs? Can she offer help to someone who, at every turn, seems to reject the smallest kindness? And can she be truly happy with Grover when so much is weighing on both of them?

Answer these questions and many more when you read The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland by Rebekah Crane.


Like I said at the beginning of this post, I think this book is much more than a YA romance, despite the somewhat light-hearted title, cover, and marketing. (Not that there’s anything wrong with YA romance.) There are moments of hilarity, sweetness, and fun, but there’s also a fair amount of grief, anger, and sadness. I’ll be perfectly honest here. I cried throughout the last quarter of the book. It hit me on nearly every emotional level.

The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland tackles some serious issues. Yes, it does so in a way that is often highly entertaining, but it’s also deliberate in addressing the problems of Zander, Cassie, Grover, and Bek. All four of these characters–and the supporting cast as well–reveal what led them to Camp Padua, and they all exhibit some measure of growth. The process is not always easy–and it’s by no means finished at the book’s conclusion–but the reader gets the clear sense that things are going to get better for the characters they’ve come to care about. That, in and of itself, is an important message.

If you’re wondering if this book is suitable for middle grade readers, I’d advise you to give it a read yourself before placing it on library or classroom shelves. It does have some mature themes and language, and some tween readers may not be ready for that. Others, on the other hand, may relate to the characters in this book and find that it is exactly what they need. As always, know your readers and use your best professional judgment.

For more information on The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland and other books by Rebekah Crane, visit the author’s website. You can also connect with the author on Twitter.

Happy reading!

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