Kill the Boy Band

I am a fangirl. I probably always have been, but we didn’t call ourselves that until recently. In my early years, I was crazy about the Smurfs, Rainbow Brite, She-Ra, and Barbara Mandrell (don’t ask). In my tween days, it was New Kids on the Block. (To be fair, I still like NKOTB. I’ve seen them in concert three times, and I’ll see them for the fourth time next month.) As a teenager, my Star Wars obsession really took off, and I now get all giddy about Harry Potter, Sherlock, Doctor Who, superheroes, and all sorts of other things. I totally own my fangirl ways. It makes me happy, and I’m not hurting anyone. And I guess that’s where I differ from the characters in my latest read, Kill the Boy Band by Goldy Moldavsky.

In this book, told from the perspective of one girl (whose real name is never revealed), we are introduced to four superfans of the Ruperts, a British boy band in which every guy’s first name is–you guessed it–Rupert. These girls essentially became friends because of their mutual obsession with the Ruperts, and, so far, they’ve seen their beloved boy band in concert, gotten a few selfies, engaged in some light stalking, and one has devoted her life to creating a website all about the band. Now, though, they’re taking their fandom to a whole new level. They’re booking a room in the same New York hotel where the boys are staying. If only it ended there…

They really didn’t mean to kidnap one of the Ruperts. Granted, they got the worst one (every boy band has one), but still. They have a Rupert in their hotel room. But what should they do with him? Get him to reveal the band’s deep, dark secrets? Make him pose for some rather embarrassing photos? Let him go, no harm, no foul? (Yeah…that last one is not going to happen.)

With each passing minute, these fangirls get ever deeper into a mess of their own making. At any point, they could call a halt to what’s going on–and the narrator wants to on several occasions–but group dynamics are a tricky thing, and this whole situation quickly takes on a life of its own. Also, a couple of our girls may have their own reasons for wanting to cause as much chaos for their so-called favorite boy band as possible. They may not be ready, however, for just how much chaos is coming.

When the unthinkable happens, these fangirls find themselves in the midst of more trouble than they ever bargained for. How can they possibly get out of it? Will their friendships–and the Ruperts–survive this fiasco? There’s only one way to find out…


Never underestimate the power of teenage girls in large groups. Many celebrities know that girls can make or destroy a career in an instant. In this book, they do much more than that. Kill the Boy Band is a dark, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, look at fandom and just how much it can take over a person’s life. Most fangirls (and fanboys) don’t cross certain lines, but one need only look at Twitter, Snapchat, or any other social media platform to see the dark side of things–stalking, threats, etc. It happens. Yes, the girls in this book take things to the extreme and allow things to get away from them, but they also kind of serve as a cautionary tale on not allowing something to completely take over your life, especially at the expense of something as basic as morality.

I did like–and relate to–parts of this book, but one big thing ruined it for me. The narrator. She threatened to bow out of the whole situation multiple times. She told her friends what they were doing was wrong. She even left their hotel room. But she. Kept. Coming. Back. If she found everything to be so horrible, she had options. Walk away. Call her mom. Notify the police. Do something other than complain and fold under peer pressure. I realize that’s easy for me to say as an adult, but her actions–and inactions–really bothered me, maybe even more than some of the more heinous action in the book.

If you decide to recommend Kill the Boy Band to readers, it’s probably not a good fit for middle grade readers. It contains profanity, some sexual situations, conversations, and innuendo, and a fair amount law-breaking. I’d probably give this book to mature teen and adult readers who’ll realize that this is not a how-to manual on getting way too close to their favorite celebrities…or getting away with murder. (Did I mean that last bit literally or figuratively? I’ll leave that for you to discover.)

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