I Am the Traitor

Warning: Read the first two books in Allen Zadoff’s The Unknown Assassin series, I Am the Weapon and I Am the Mission, before proceeding.

Happy publication day to Allen Zadoff! The third and final book of The Unknown Assassin trilogy, I Am the Traitor, drops today. Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to finish this book yesterday, so now I’m sharing what I think about it (and the series as a whole) with all of you. You’re welcome.

I Am the Traitor continues the story of a sixteen-year-old boy involved with a shadow organization known only as The Program. In the previous two books, this boy began to question his place in The Program, his orders, and the bits of information they chose to reveal. Now, he’s on the run, and he’s trying to uncover the truth about his past and what The Program is really trying to do. He doesn’t know who to trust, and the odds of getting out of this mess alive aren’t looking good…

He’s sixteen years old, he’s a highly trained assassin, and he’s on a collision course with the truth about himself and his past.

He’s been known by many names–Ben, Daniel, and others on dozens of missions with The Program. Now, though, he’s returning to his true name, Zach Abram, and he’s doing everything possible to find out what really happened when he was enlisted as a child soldier in The Program. But Zach may not be prepared for some of the answers he receives.

As Zach searches for answers, he must also find a way to rescue the only friend he’s ever really had. Howard, a tech genius Zach met on a previous mission, has been captured by The Program. Zach knows Howard is likely being tortured, all because he tried to help find the truth.

When Zach finds Howard, however, he also finds another kid–a girl named Tanya. Zach doesn’t completely trust this girl, but there’s also something about her that manages to draw him in. In any case, he now has two other people to worry about, and The Program–and one of its top assassins–is closing in.

Even with the constant threat of The Program looming, Zach, Howard, and Tanya manage to find bits and pieces of information on the biggest mystery in Zach’s life: What really happened to his parents? Did The Program assassinate them like he’s always been told? Were they killed in an accident? Or is the truth much more sinister and complicated? What’s really going on, and is Zach prepared to handle what’s revealed about his family and his origins with The Program?

A showdown with those who run The Program is coming, and Zach must gear up for the fight of his life. Is he prepared to do what must be done to finally be free? Or will he choose to stay with The Program, an organization that has been the only constant in his life for the past five years? And who can he really trust in this life-changing dilemma?

Decisions must be made, and Zach has to be ready–using all of his Program training–to deal with whatever consequences come his way. Who will he ultimately betray in the end–The Program, his friends, or himself?

Join Zach and company on their quest for the truth when you read I Am the Traitor, the thrilling conclusion to a gripping series by Allen Zadoff!

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Now that I’ve finished this entire series (I’m guessing), I have to say that I really enjoyed it. It was action-packed, and it definitely kept me guessing. The twist at the end of this final book threw me for a loop, and, though I probably should have seen it coming, I was as surprised as our anti-hero, Zach.

Even though I like a clear-cut ending as much as the next person, I did kind of like that I Am the Traitor left things a bit open. It’s really up to the reader (at least at this point) to determine how the story proceeds for Zach and what the ramifications of his decisions will be. My hope is that young writers will develop some interesting fanfiction and show us how things progress for the remaining characters in this series. (Yeah, I said “remaining.” Big shocker that not everyone survives in a series about teen assassins.)

Given that violence is a huge part of this entire series, I don’t know how comfortable I feel recommending these books to middle grade readers. (Yes, I realize they likely see this stuff all the time in video games, TV, and movies, not to mention the evening news. I don’t have to pile on, though.) Also, I Am the Traitor has an instance or two of sexy times. (Again, I’m not so naive that I think younger readers don’t experience or know anything about sex. Again, I don’t have to pile on.) With all of that stuff together, I would say the series as a whole is better suited to those in high school and beyond. Ultimately, however, it’s up to you to decide what belongs in your classroom, school, or personal library. I’m just a messenger.

In closing, if you like The Bourne Identity and other psychological thrillers with a bit of political intrigue thrown in, give the Unknown Assassin trilogy a try. I hope you enjoy this wild ride as much as I did!

For more information about I Am the Traitor, the rest of the series, and author Allen Zadoff, check out the author’s website, Twitter feed, the series Facebook page, and Goodreads.

*Note: You may often find this series referred to by different names, Boy Nobody being the most prevalent.*

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I Am the Mission

Caution! It is imperative that you read I Am the Weapon, book one in Allen Zadoff’s Unknown Assassin series, before continuing with book two, I Am the Mission. This message will self-destruct in 3…2…1…

Just kidding. This message won’t do anything. But seriously, read the first book.

As you’ve probably gathered, I recently read I Am the Mission, the nerve-wracking sequel to I am the Weapon. This second installment picks up shortly after the conclusion of book one, and it is quite the page-turner.

I Am the Mission came out on June 17th, and some of you may have seen it under a couple of different titles: The Lost Mission or Fearless. (Thanks to NetGalley, I read a digital proof of the book with The Lost Mission as its title.) No matter what the title, though, the book is gripping and continues to follow the life of young man who works as an assassin for a group known only as The Program. This teenager moves from one identity, one assignment, to the next, and his only concerns are to eliminate his targets and protect The Program at all costs. During his last mission, however, he began to question his orders, and that tiny seed of doubt is creeping in once again…

After going off the grid for a bit–to come to grips with his last mission and to get his head on straight–this boy, who we’ve previously known as Ben, is pulled back into The Program. His loyalty is being questioned, and he knows he’ll have to suppress his doubts to keep his handlers from deciding he’s too much of a threat to their organization. One way to do that is to complete the next mission he’s given.

When another operative for The Program is seemingly terminated, our boy–who now goes by Daniel–is tasked with completing this lost mission. His job is to kill Eugene Moore, a man who runs Camp Liberty and appears to be amassing an army of young people for the express purpose of overthrowing the government and/or committing acts of domestic terrorism.

The job should have been an easy in-and-out, but things quickly grow complicated, and Daniel finds himself being led to Moore’s training camp with no way of getting word to The Program. His only option now is to become a part of Camp Liberty, get close to Moore’s kids, and look for another opportunity to eliminate this new threat to national security. It isn’t easy, though. This camp takes its own protection very seriously, and not everyone trusts the new guy sniffing around.

As Daniel learns more about the camp and its leader, he tries to get word to The Program about what is going on…but his efforts amount to nothing. He cannot reach anyone, and, after a harrowing episode at what should have been a safe house, Daniel seriously questions what has happened to The Program. Has their security been breached? Has this secret organization been disabled? Or is there something much more sinister at work? Something, perhaps, targeted at Daniel himself?

Questions abound for Daniel on this chaotic mission, but he remains determined to carry out his orders…even when he learns that The Program has not exactly been truthful with him. Daniel must act without mercy against those who would seek to do harm to the country. To do that, he will have to put aside fear, potential friendships, and his own safety to see this mission to its explosive end. Will Daniel’s efforts be enough? Will he uncover The Program’s secrets in the process? Only time will tell, and that may be running out for young Daniel…

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I think I mentioned in my post on I Am the Weapon that our protagonist in this series can’t really be called a hero. If anything, I’d label his as an anti-hero. In the end, yes, he does demonstrate some heroic tendencies, but Daniel–or whatever you want to call him–has questionable loyalties sometimes, he’s been known to blindly follow orders, and he is, let’s face it, an assassin. Even when he has doubts about how someone fits into what’s going on, he kills them if they get in his way. (If you couldn’t tell, one of the deaths in this book kind of bothered me. I didn’t think this person needed to die. Daniel felt differently.) With all of that, though, I still found myself rooting for him. I wanted him to question his orders. I hoped he would put an end to the brainwashing going on at Camp Liberty. I wished for him to come out of everything unharmed. Unharmed, but determined to finally uncover the truth about The Program. For the most part, I think I got what I wanted.

For those considering purchasing this book–and its predecessor–for personal or school/classroom libraries, I feel I must give a word of caution. This series is, in my humble opinion, written for a young adult audience. It is violent at times (which fits with a protagonist who is an assassin), and there are a couple of sexual situations. Language was true to the setting, but some younger readers (and their parents) may have problems with it. Also, there are some political issues in this book that require some serious, intense thought and knowledge of the current political climate in the United States. For all of those reasons, I would recommend this series to readers in tenth grade and up. These books are written for an audience with some maturity. (No offense intended to anyone reading this who is a ninth grader or younger.)

If you’re interested in The Unknown Assassin series or other books by Allen Zadoff, check out his website.

There’s no word yet on when we can expect the next book in this series, but, given how things ended in I Am the Mission, I hope it’s soon!