Gabriel Finley & the Raven’s Riddle

Even though I’ve felt like absolute crap for the past couple of days, I did manage to finish another of this year’s South Carolina Children’s Book Award nominees, Gabriel Finley & the Raven’s Riddle by George Hagen. (Only two more to go!)

This book, suitable for upper elementary grade readers on up, is a fantastical tale full of mystery, peril, and riddles. It’s a great book for those readers who’ve exhausted the Harry Potter series and are looking for something similar. And given how this book ended, I’m hopeful that we’ll see more of Gabriel Finley and friends in the future.

Gabriel Finley’s father, Adam, has been missing for several years. Gabriel lives in Brooklyn with his aunt, but he never stops wondering what happened to his father. Soon, though, Gabriel will begin to solve the riddle of his missing father…and so much more.

When Gabriel discovers that he can communicate with ravens–who are the most intelligent of all the birds–secrets begin to be revealed. As it turns out, his dad shared this gift, and it could have something to do with his disappearance. Gabriel’s dad worked with his own raven companion, or amicus, to hide a powerful object from the valravens (cursed, fiendish birds) and their leader, Corax, a being who is half-man, half-valraven…and Gabriel’s uncle.

With the help of his own amicus, Paladin, and several friends, Gabriel begins to unravel the truth of what his uncle is seeking and the whereabouts of his father. The journey involves untangling riddles, battle with a magical, music-loving desk, and learning about the Finley family’s secrets. Gabriel is determined to find his way to his father, but forces are at work that are equally determined to stop him.

Is Gabriel ready to descend into Aviopolis, Corax’s horrifying domain, risking the lives of himself and his friends, to prevent Corax from ruling both above and below the surface? Will he be able to rescue his father, save himself and his friends, and defeat the evil Corax? Read Gabriel Finley & the Raven’s Riddle to find out!


I barely touched on my favorite part of this book–the riddles. To a word nerd like myself, they were fun and entertaining, and I loved that saving the world in this book relied more on using one’s brain than relying on brawn. I’m hoping my students have as much fun as I did figuring out the answers to the riddles, and I think reading this book could lead to readers crafting their own riddles.

As of right now, there’s no word on future Gabriel Finley books, but I’ll definitely be on the lookout. There are several mysteries in Gabriel’s life that are yet to be solved, and I, for one, would love some answers. In the meantime, if you’d like to learn more about this great fantasy, visit the Gabriel Finley website. Enjoy!

Yellow Brick War

Notice: Before reading the post below or Yellow Brick War, the third book in Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series, you must read the books and prequel novellas below. If you’re all caught up, proceed at will. If not, you’ve got some work to do.

With that out of the way, let’s move on to Yellow Brick War. I’m not going to do a big recap of the series up to this point. You can read my posts on the books above for that. Let’s just jump right in, shall we?

Once again, Amy Gumm has failed in her quest to kill Dorothy. Now, she and the Order of the Wicked are stranded in Kansas, the last place Amy ever wanted to see again…but there might be something hidden here–the silver slippers that Dorothy wore during her first visit to Oz–that could help them defeat Dorothy, Glinda, and their armies before both Oz and Kansas (known to Ozians as the Other Place) are destroyed once and for all. But how is Amy supposed to find a pair of shoes that have been hidden for years and that most people don’t think exist? Well, the answer is simple.

She has to go back to high school.

Amy is reluctant to return to the life she left behind, but it is her only option. She reunites with her mother–who has undergone a drastic change for the better–and she encounters Madison, the girl who tormented her all through school. Madison, too, has changed. She’s a teen mother dealing with her own struggles and facing ostracism by those who once kowtowed to her. She and Amy form an unlikely alliance, and Amy begins to wonder if coming back to her old life–for good–might really be possible after all.

But nothing is ever that simple when it comes to the battle for Oz…

While Amy is searching her high school for the slippers that will help her and the Wicked return to Oz–because of course these magic shoes are hidden in a Kansas high school–she encounters a terrifying figure that could be even more dangerous than Dorothy or Glinda. It’s the ancient Nome King, a powerful, dark creature who has plans of his own for Amy. Could he be the one manipulating everything happening in Oz? Is he somehow connected to Glinda’s grab for power or Dorothy’s return to Oz and her addiction to magic? Amy’s not sure what’s going on, but she does know that she must do whatever it takes to save both Oz and her home (a place that’s maybe not so bad after all).

With the silver slippers–or combat boots–in her possession, Amy and the Wicked make their return to Oz to discover that things are even bleaker than ever. War with both Glinda and Dorothy is imminent. Amy and friends must gather whatever forces they can if they have any hope of defeating their foes. Amy will have to tap into the dark magic that she finds both terrifying and exhilarating. But will it be enough?

Can Amy and the Wicked win against two enormously powerful fronts? What will be lost in the process? Who will provide help when they need it the most? Will Amy finally be able to kill Dorothy and return balance to Oz? Is a much larger threat just waiting in the wings?

Discover what awaits Amy and her Wicked friends when you read Yellow Brick War, the thrilling third book in Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series!


I’ve left soooo much out of what happens in this book. Just trust me when I say that it’s action-packed from start to finish–much like the rest of the series–and I am eager to see how things progress for Amy and company in the final book in the series, The End of Oz. This book is set to be released on February 22nd, 2017.

If February is just too darn far away for you, there are three more prequel novellas to look forward to. One of them, Order of the Wicked (novella 0.7), is already out, and I plan to read it as soon as finish a few other books-in-progress. The other two are not yet titled, and I’m not sure when they’ll be out. If the series stays true to form, they’ll be available before February.

For more information on this wonderful series and author extraordinaire Danielle Paige, connect with the author on her website, Twitter, Goodreads, and Facebook. You may also want to check out Epic Reads’ Yellow Brick War book trailer below. It’s pretty great.

Finally, Danielle Paige is scheduled to be at YALLFest again this year, so, if you’d like to attend this outstanding YA book festival in lovely Charleston, SC, this November, click here for more info. I hope to see you there!

The Seventh Wish

What do you get when you combine a wish-giving fish, Irish dancing, and drug addiction? You get The Seventh Wish, Kate Messner’s newest book. This book is weird, moving, and magical. It will be released this Tuesday, and it is at once fun and serious. Yes, there is a fantastical element to it, and it’s often entertaining to see how that plays out, but the book also deals with some difficult situations. Those situations are handled in a very real, accessible way, and it’s interesting to see how serious issues may be viewed through a child’s eyes.

Charlie doesn’t expect much from her ice fishing adventures with her friend and his grandmother. But when she comes across a fish that agrees to grant a wish in exchange for its freedom, Charlie reevaluates things. Maybe this fish can help Charlie, her friends, and her family get everything they’ve been hoping for.

As one could imagine, a girl isn’t going to let a wish-granting fish go to waste, so she puts it to good use. Charlie wishes for her mom to get a new job, for one friend to pass her English exam, for another to make the basketball team, and for a boy she likes to fall in love with her. Unfortunately, Charlie learns rather quickly that one must be extremely specific when speaking to a wish fish. Her wishes, however well-intended, are not turning out as she would have hoped.

Even with all of this wishing and fishing going on, Charlie still has to find time to work on her science project and practice her Irish dancing. A big dance competition is coming up, and she could have the opportunity to move up into a higher class. It’s a big deal, and Charlie has been psyching herself up for a while. She won’t let anything get in her way.

Sadly, something does happen that derails Charlie’s plans as well as everything she ever believed about her big sister. When it’s revealed that her sister, who’s been away at college, is having problems with heroin addiction, Charlie’s family–her whole world, really–changes. Everyone drops everything to help Charlie’s sister, and, while Charlie understands why, she’s also angry that she’s having to give up so much. Her dance competition, time with friends to work on their science project, and nearly everything else. Isn’t she important, too?

Charlie wonders if her wish fish could somehow help to make her sister and this horrible situation better. If she’s very careful with her words, maybe it could. Maybe her sister could come home and be the girl that Charlie always looked up to. It couldn’t hurt, right?

For a while, everything is going okay, but then something happens that shakes Charlie’s world once again, and Charlie knows that her wish fish can’t help with this one. Some things are just to big too let a little fish handle.


This book brings to mind the saying, “Be careful what you wish for.” Charlie’s wishes definitely get away from her, and she learns quickly that words have power. Some of the situations she found herself in were kind of funny. Others, as you’ve no doubt gathered, were heart-breaking.

Some adults may hesitate to put this book in elementary or middle school libraries because it deals with the topic of heroin addiction. Nothing is sugar-coated here, but I do think the topic is handled with care and empathy. Like it or not, some of our younger students deal with addiction as a daily part of their lives, and they need stories that show them that they’re not alone. I think The Seventh Fish is a book that speaks to students who’ve had siblings, parents, or friends suffering from addiction. I also think it might enlighten those who haven’t dealt with such a serious issue.

Will I be placing this book in my elementary school library? Yes, I will.

If you’d like to learn more about The Seventh Wish so that you can decide if it has a place in your school, classroom, public, or personal library, visit author Kate Messner’s website.

Many thanks to NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book a little early.

The Hidden Oracle

Caution: You might want to read the entire Percy Jackson and the Olympians (The Lightning Thief, The Sea of Monsters, The Titan’s Curse, The Battle of the Labyrinth, The Last Olympian) and The Heroes of Olympus series (The Lost Hero, The Son of Neptune, The Mark of Athena, The House of Hades, The Blood of Olympus) before proceeding.

It should come as no surprise that I love Rick Riordan’s latest offering. The Hidden Oracle, book one in the new Trials of Apollo series, is as wonderful as everything else I’ve read by this amazing author. It takes readers back to Camp Half-Blood, but the approach is a bit different in this book. As you may have surmised from the series title, we’re seeing the action from Apollo’s perspective.

You may know Apollo as the Greek god of the sun, music, prophecy, archery, poetry, and so on, but there’s a bit of a hiccup in the life of this deity. After the events of the war with Gaea, Zeus is kind of upset with Apollo and decides to punish him. What does dear old dad do? He makes Apollo human, of course, and that is where our fun begins.

What could have been so bad for Apollo to deserve such a fate? Now mortal and stuck in the body of a flabby, acne-ridden sixteen-year-old known as Lester Papadopoulos, this once-perfect specimen must find a way back into Zeus’ good graces. That might prove difficult given that someone is trying take advantage of Apollo’s weakness and kill him.

Unexpected help comes in the form of one Meg McCaffrey, a strange girl–obviously a demigod–who fights like few Apollo has ever seen. Meg’s assistance, however, comes with a price.  Apollo is bound to serve Meg and complete a series of trials to earn back the favor of Zeus. No biggie, right? Yeah…nothing is ever that easy when it comes to Greek gods.

After a rather harrowing beginning in the streets of New York City, Apollo, Meg, and a familiar face make their way to Camp Half-Blood. Surely Apollo can get some sort of help at this refuge for demigods. After all, who wouldn’t want to help him? He’s clearly awesome.

Things at Camp Half-Blood, though, aren’t exactly rosy. Campers are disappearing, communication lines are down, there have been no new prophecies in a while, and no one really knows what’s going on or what to do about it. It’s clear that something major is happening, but what?

Who’s responsible for all this madness and mayhem, and what could Apollo, a once all-powerful, now virtually powerless god, possibly do to remedy the situation and prevent catastrophe from striking Camp Half-Blood? Who will help–or hinder–him in his search for a solution? And what could all of this mean for the future of Camp Half-Blood…and the world as we know it?


Yeah…this post, like so many before it, doesn’t even come close to capturing how fantastic this book is. It’s peppered with snark and sarcasm, like Riordan’s other books, but this book also has something we haven’t seen before from this author–haiku. Each chapter begins with a haiku, written by Apollo, that foreshadows what we’ll encounter. It’s awesome, and I hope that it encourages many readers to write their own haiku, the more ridiculous the better.

In addition to the fabulous haiku, Apollo’s voice in this book–and I’m guessing the rest of the series–is equally exceptional. Just what does a god made human think of himself? Well, wonder no more. At the beginning of the book, Apollo, though humiliated at being made mortal, is also extremely impressed with himself. Sure, there are things he’s done that he’s not 100% proud of, but those don’t give him much pause. Or do they? As the story progresses, we see that Apollo does have regrets and that he’s at least trying to make amends. Is he successful? Well, that’s really for the reader (and Zeus) to decide.

Before I give too much away, I’m going to end this post. Suffice it to say that The Hidden Oracle is exactly what we’ve come to expect from Rick Riordan…and so much more. I can hardly wait to read more of Apollo’s exploits, but waiting is what I’ll have to do (as usual). Book two, The Dark Prophecy, won’t be out until next May.

In the meantime, you might want to learn more about all of Rick Riordan’s fabulous books on his website. You may also want to check out Disney Books’ hilarious, spot-on book trailers for The Hidden Oracle. I’ve included two of them here. There’s one more, focusing on the sun, that I couldn’t get to work.

The Phantom Tollbooth

For the final meeting of my school’s faculty book club this year, we (I) decided to read books we’ve been meaning to read but never made time for. This could mean classics that have been around for decades, new releases that we’ve heard others talking about, or anything in between.

My pick, The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster, qualifies as a classic, in my opinion. Originally published in 1961, it’s been around a while, and I’d heard it mentioned once or twice. I’d even noticed it on my library shelves, but I never really got the push I needed to read it until my latest book club assignment. Well, I finished reading it last night, and I could kick myself for waiting so long to pick up this wondrous book. Anyone who’s a fan of wordplay, number play, or moral lessons within the pages of children’s books will find something to love in The Phantom Tollbooth, a book that is both timely and timeless.

Milo is bored. Nothing interests him, and he’s not motivated to do much of anything. Everything changes, however, when a tollbooth appears in his bedroom. Milo, lacking anything pressing to do, pays his toll and drives on through. Through to where, you ask? Well, that’s the tricky part…

Milo finds himself outside the Kingdom of Wisdom, and things are a bit different here. This troubled land, ruled by King Azaz the Unabridged of Dictionopolis and the Mathemagician of Digitopolis, has not been the same since the princesses Rhyme and Reason were banished.

Milo, joined by Tock (a watchdog) and the Humbug, is eventually tasked with rescuing Rhyme and Reason from the Castle in the Air and returning the princesses to their rightful place in the Kingdom of Wisdom. Only then can order be restored.

Along the way, Milo and company encounter many beings who change the way they see the world around them. They begin to see things from different points of view, and they look at things like sound, color, words, and numbers in a whole new way.

They also encounter their share of trouble. Before Milo, Tock, and the Humbug can reach the princesses, they must first pass through the Mountains of Ignorance. Horrible figures like the Gelatinous Giant and the Terrible Trivium seek to stop this heroic quest, but their efforts are for naught. Milo and friends escape with the princesses, and the armies of Wisdom drive away the vicious demons of Ignorance.

All is well–for now–with Rhyme and Reason back in their place. The Kingdom of Wisdom celebrates, and King Azaz and the Mathemagician vow to do all they can to keep Ignorance at bay. His quest complete, Milo says farewell to his friends and returns to his bedroom by way of the phantom tollbooth, ready to look at his own world in a new light.


Unlike King Azaz, the recap above is super-duper abridged. I can’t even begin to go into all of the humorous word and number play in this amazing book, but I will highlight a couple of things.

Lest you think that The Phantom Tollbooth is simply a children’s book, I urge you to think again. It challenges readers to truly appreciate the world around them, experience all that world has to offer, and do whatever they can to fend off ignorance in the world. A timely message, yes? Consider the passage below, wherein the demons of Ignorance are chasing after Milo and friends, and think about how similar this may be to certain political figures:

“From off on the right, his heavy bulbous body lurching dangerously on the spindly legs which barely supported him, came the Overbearing Know-it-all, talking continuously. A dismal demon who was mostly mouth, he was ready at a moment’s notice to offer misinformation on any subject. And, while he often tumbled heavily, it was never he who was hurt, but, rather, the unfortunate person on whom he fell.

Next to him, but just a little behind, came the Gross Exaggeration, whose grotesque features and thoroughly unpleasant manners were hideous to see, and whose rows of wicked teeth were made only to mangle the truth. They hunted together, and were bad luck to anyone they caught.”

Sound familiar?

Even if you’re not at all interested in the similarities to our current political climate, you’re sure to enjoy the often hilarious wordplay in this book, especially if you’re a fan of puns. The Phantom Tollbooth would be an excellent read-aloud in upper elementary and middle grades and is perfect for studying idioms. One of my favorite parts of the book, which occurred early on, was the island of Conclusions. And how does one get to this island? You jump there, of course! That’s just one of the many examples of fun wordplay in this magical book.

The Phantom Tollbooth is a book you need to experience for yourself. This is a book that nearly any reader–from about third grade on up through adulthood–can and should enjoy. There’s definitely something here for everyone, especially those who’ve found joy in Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, or The Wind in the Willows. I look forward to talking to my book club about this read and encouraging all of them to give it a try!

Tell the Wind and Fire

On April 5th, Sarah Rees Brennan’s new book, Tell the Wind and Fire, will be released. Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read the book a little early, and I bring you my thoughts on this gripping fantasy today.

I began reading Tell the Wind and Fire in early March, and I have to admit that it took me quite some time to really get invested in the story. It wasn’t clear in the beginning what kind of world I was reading about. It took a while for me to figure out just what was going on in this futuristic, magic-infused version of New York. Truth be told, I’m still trying to work things out. The story did pick up, though, and the more I read, the more intrigued I was…and the more I saw our world reflected in the pages of this book.

The world is divided. Those who live in the Light enjoy wealth, luxury, and freedom. Those in the Dark are poor, hungry, and oppressed. Lucie Manette, born in the Dark, is part of both worlds, and she skirts a fine line between wanting to stay safe and knowing that things should be changed.

Lucie is a Light Magician. As such, she practices what is considered the most pure form of magic. She’s used her magic to save her father and earn a place in Light New York. She has a seemingly perfect boyfriend, Ethan, son of the most powerful family in the city, and, though some things weigh on her, life is going relatively well for Lucie.

Until it’s not.

A disturbing encounter on a train brings both Lucie and Ethan face-to-face with a secret that could tear both of their worlds apart. It is here that they meet Carwyn, a young man created with the Darkest of magic. He saves Ethan from a horrible fate…by revealing that he is Ethan’s doppelganger, a Dark Magician who could destroy Ethan and his entire family.

Carwyn’s sudden appearance begins a series of events that force both Lucie and Ethan to confront what’s really going on in the city…and what they must do to change things. But their action–or lack thereof–may not be enough to control the storm that is coming. Those in the Dark are determined to wage war, and they see Lucie as the face of their revolution. They’re determined to beat back the Light…at any cost.

What is Lucie to do? How can she possibly take on one more burden when she already feels overloaded by everything she’s done and the many secrets she’s keeping? Can she trust Carwyn to help her save Ethan–and many others–from a terrible fate? What is her connection to this Dark revolution, and can she use that connection to her advantage?

The Light and the Dark are at war in New York City, and Lucie must decide what she’s willing to do–and who she’s willing to sacrifice–to save those she loves. What will she ultimately decide? And how will that shape Lucie in the fight to come? Discover the truth for yourself when you read Tell the Wind and Fire by Sarah Rees Brennan.


According to the author’s note at the end of the book, Tell the Wind and Fire is a loose retelling of A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. I wish I had known that going in. I’m not a huge Dickens fan, but I may have read A Tale of Two Cities before starting this book if I had known of that connection. (I loathed Dickens in high school. I haven’t revisited his books as an adult. It may be time to change that. Maybe I’ll enjoy his work more now.) As it is, reading both books could lead to some interesting discussions and comparisons.

Tell the Wind and Fire definitely illuminates the differences between the haves and have-nots in any society. Unless you’re living under a rock, you know that this is something our society deals with daily. The “haves” keep getting more, can buy their way out of nearly anything, and enjoy a life of privilege. The “have-nots” are persecuted, blamed for their circumstances, feared, and oftentimes barely surviving. What’s more, those in power frequently do whatever they can to keep the have-nots at the bottom of the food chain, enacting laws and erecting walls that divide the world more than ever.

Am I talking about the book or the world today? Exactly.

This book is sure to start some lively discussions amongst its readers. It is violent, timely, and thought-provoking. I look forward to reading more and seeing how Lucie handles everything that happens and where it leads her. (I have no idea when we can expect a second book, but, given how Tell the Wind and Fire ended, I’m pretty confident that a sequel is coming.)

I would recommend Tell the Wind and Fire to YA and adult readers. It is extremely violent at times and deals with a politically turbulent society. Older readers, in my opinion, will appreciate the horrors and complexities in this book more than middle grade readers will.

If you’d like to learn more about Tell the Wind and Fire or other books by Sarah Rees Brennan, you can connect with the author on her website, Tumblr, and Twitter. You may also want to take a look at the book trailer below. It gives a bit more information about Tell the Wind and Fire and may explain things a bit better than I did.

Lady Midnight

Unless you are brand new to this blog, you know that I have a mild obsession with Cassandra Clare’s writing. Despite the current controversy (which I won’t go into here) and the less-than-spectacular movie and TV adaptations of her work, I remain a loyal fan. My enjoyment of her writing has only increased with her latest novel, Lady Midnight, the first book in the new Dark Artifices trilogy.

But before we move on to Lady Midnight, if you’re not already familiar with Clare’s Shadowhunter novels, you’ve got a bit of catching up to do. Read these books first:

For whatever reason, I neglected to write posts on City of Ashes or The Bane Chronicles. Trust me, they’re just as awesome as the other books. In the case of The Bane Chronicles, probably more awesome. (It’s no secret that the High Warlock of Brooklyn is my favorite character.)


Now, let’s turn our attention to Lady Midnight. Some may be a little shocked that I’m just now getting around to posting on this book, especially considering my love of Clare’s books. I promise I have very good reasons.

  1. I pre-ordered the book through Barnes & Noble, and it didn’t arrive at my house until March 11th, three days after the release date. (I can’t complain too much, though. I did get an autographed copy.)
  2. My school book fair kicked off on March 10th and didn’t wrap up until yesterday. If you’ve ever run an elementary school book fair, you know how exhausting it is. I barely had enough energy to read more than a couple of chapters before passing out each night.
  3. My Battle of the Books team has been preparing for competition. Our regionals were this past Tuesday, and I’m pleased to report that we’re moving on to finals next week.

Even with all of that going on, I did manage to finish Lady Midnight last night, and, like I expected, it made me want to weep, rage, and throw things. I mean that in the best possible way.

Lady Midnight takes place in Los Angeles and focuses primarily on Emma Carstairs and Julian Blackthorn. These parabatai live at the LA Institute with the younger Blackthorn children–Ty, Livvy, Dru, and Tavvy–their mostly absent uncle Arthur, and Cristina, a Shadowhunter visiting from Mexico (and possibly escaping her own past).

It’s been five years since the Dark War that took so many Shadowhunters from them, including Emma’s parents and Julian’s father, and time has molded both Emma and Julian into much more than the children they once were. Emma is bent on finding out what really happened to her parents, and Julian is doing everything he can to keep his family together while hiding his wealth of feelings from everyone around him.

When strange murders with possible demonic ties begin occurring in LA, Emma and Julian know they must investigate…but there’s a problem. Some of the victims are Faeries, and the Cold Peace prevents Shadowhunters from investigating crimes involving Faeries. That doesn’t exactly stop Emma and Julian, and the waters get even more muddied when a Faerie convoy arrives at the Institute with an incentive for the young Shadowhunters to provide assistance. In return for their help in capturing the killer and handing him/her over to the Fey, they’ll return Mark Blackthorn–half-Fey, half-Shadowhunter, member of the Wild Hunt, and Julian’s older brother–back to his family.

Mark’s sudden return to his family is an adjustment for everyone…most especially Mark. He struggles with what it means to be part of the human world once more. Part of him longs to return to the Wild Hunt…and what he left behind. Another part of him wants to contribute to his family, but so much has changed since he left. Where exactly does he fit?

As Mark is dealing with his own turmoil, so are Emma and Julian. Emma is certain that the odd murders in LA are somehow tied to her parents. She recklessly follows every lead she can, leading herself and others into more danger than they expected.

As for Julian, he’s finding it harder and harder to hold everything and everyone together. So much has been placed on his young shoulders, and he’s not sure how much more he can handle. Throw in the fact that he’s in love with Emma, his parabatai, and things get even more complicated.

Even as Emma and Julian grow closer together, closer than is allowed by Shadowhunter law, danger and betrayal are making their way toward the Los Angeles Institute and its inhabitants. Who will be left standing when all is said and done? What will be unleashed should these young Shadowhunters fail to stop the maniacal killer? What could it all mean for the Blackthorns and their closest allies?

Read Lady Midnight, the first book of The Dark Artifices, to learn the answers to these questions and many more…


Oh, I have left out sooooo much here. I didn’t even really touch on Cristina’s issues, Ty and how the Clave views those who are “different,” or the appearance of the “Lost Herondale.” I couldn’t possibly cover everything in one blog post, so I’m not even going to try. Suffice it to say that a LOT happens in the nearly 700 pages of this book, and everything is important.

If you’re also a Shadowhunter fan, you’ll be pleased to know that we do see some old favorites in Lady Midnight. Tessa, Jem, Magnus, Jace, Clary, and Church all make appearances, and I’m confident we’ll see more of them as the series progresses.

Speaking of the rest of the series, the next book, Lord of Shadows, is set to be released in May of 2017, and book three, The Queen of Air and Darkness will be out sometime in 2018. Long waits ahead, people.

If you’d like more information on Lady Midnight and all things Shadowhunter, visit Cassie Clare’s website, Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, and Mundie Moms. You may also want to check out the video below from Cassie herself.

That’s all from me for now. I hope you enjoy Lady Midnight as much as I did!