Three Dark Crowns

I don’t know quite where to begin. I finished reading Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake a few hours ago, and I’m still processing what happened in this book, particularly the batcrap crazy ending. (I mean that in the best way.) This book is convoluted and vicious–perfect for fans of Kiersten White’s And I Darken and Sabaa Tahir’s An Ember in the Ashes–and I can hardly wait for more.

On the mysterious island of Fennbirn, three sisters–triplets–vie to be the last queen standing. Separated at an early age, the girls grow up knowing that they may one day have to kill their sisters in order to claim the crown. Each queen is supposed to be endowed with her own special brand of magic, and the strength of that magic could lead one of the young women to rule.

Katharine is a poisoner. She should be able to ingest even the most dangerous poison with no consequences. She can craft poisons with the best of them, but she cannot yet consume toxins without being violently ill. If her gift does not arrive soon–before Beltane–she fears that her quest for the throne will be short-lived.

Arsinoe is in a similar situation. She is a naturalist, but she cannot yet control even the smallest portion of the natural world around her, and there is no sign of her animal familiar on the horizon. Her companion, Jules, a powerful naturalist in her own right, has been trying to coax Arsinoe’s gift out of hiding, but the only magic Arsinoe experiences–dangerous spells performed with her own blood–may come with a cost more dire than she realizes.

Mirabella is widely considered to be the front-runner for the crown. She is a powerful elemental, and she has been controlling wind, fire, water, and earth for years. But Mirabella wonders if she’s truly capable of killing her sisters when the time comes. She remembers with fondness their lives before they were separated, and her unwillingness to do her sisters harm is viewed as weakness by those in power. Her path to the throne may seem clear, but her own feelings may cloud the way.

Each of these three sisters are attempting to figure out where they stand in Fennbirn, but they are running out of time to come to terms with their destinies. Their quests for the crown truly begin at the upcoming Beltane celebration. After that, two of them must die so that one can be queen. Add in questions about their gifts, power struggles from without and within, suitors vying for their hands, betrayal, and their own often conflicted feelings, and something has to give.

Will Katharine and Arsinoe receive their gifts before Beltane? If not, can they make others believe they are fit to be queen? Is Mirabella truly the most powerful of the three and destined to be the sole queen? Or does fate have something else in store for these sisters and those who would see them killed or crowned?


I’ve left out A LOT here, but I didn’t want to give too much away. I will say, however, that it’s difficult to determine which of the sisters–if any–should truly be queen. I felt sympathy with each of them at different points, but I can’t say that I was really rooting for any of them. As a matter of fact, I didn’t really like the sisters throughout much of the book. Jules, Arsinoe’s companion, was probably the only character in the book that I 100% liked. That’s okay, though. I think my conflicted feelings on these characters are exactly what the author intended. Nothing is clear cut in this book, and that makes things very intriguing.

For those wondering if Three Dark Crowns is a good fit for middle grade readers, I have to say…I’m not sure. It is brutal, and there are some sexy times (which are kind of understated). Some middle grade readers may be able to handle it; others won’t. I would probably recommend this book to grades 8 and up, but I urge you to read the book for yourself if you work with tweens and young teens. You know your readers better than I do.

The next book in this series, One Dark Throne, comes out on September 19th. There will also be a prequel novella, The Young Queens, released on December 26th. Lots to look forward to in this exciting series!

For more information on Three Dark Crowns, visit author Kendare Blake’s website or connect with her on Twitter. You may also want to check out the awesome book trailer from Epic Reads below. Enjoy!

Advertisements

Lord of Shadows

It’s a special day here at Knight Reader. Today, I celebrate my 827th post and my 9th year as a blogger. That’s right. Today is Knight Reader’s 9th blogoversary. That may not mean much to most people, but it’s kind of a big deal to me, especially considering that I think about hanging it up at least once a week.

Knight Reader has seen me through good times and bad: the births of my nieces, health scares, loss of friends and family, and the transition from a high school to an elementary school librarian. It’s been a constant, and, despite my sometimes conflicted feelings on keeping it going, it will likely remain a constant in my life. As long as people keep reading what I care to write, I’ll do my best to keep this blog around.


So…9 years. It seems fitting that my post today focuses on one of my absolute favorite authors/worlds. The second post I ever wrote was about how awesome Cassandra Clare was, and today’s post, my 827th, focuses on Clare’s Lord of Shadows, the second book of The Dark Artifices. As you may know, this series continues to explore the world of Shadowhunters, fierce warriors with angelic blood. There are many, many stories that precede this one, and I’ve listed those below (with available reviews) if you’d care to catch up. (Note: Feel free to completely ignore the movie and TV adaptations of these books. They are crap.)

Now, let’s move onto Lord of Shadows. If you’re not caught up, the rest of this post may be a bit spoilery, so be prepared.

Life is never exactly easy for Shadowhunters, but it appears to be especially difficult right now for those who live in the Los Angeles Institute. They thought they knew Malcolm Fade, warlock extraordinaire. They though they could trust him. They counted him as a friend. And he betrayed them. All this time, he was working against them, killing to further his own agenda. Now, Malcolm is dead, and this tight-knit group of Shadowhunters is dealing with the fallout.

Emma Carstairs is the fierce Shadowhunter who killed Malcolm Fade. She did what she had to do, and she’d do it again to protect those she loves, particularly the Blackthorn family. This family, especially her parabatai Julian, means everything to her, and she’ll do whatever is necessary to keep them safe…even if it means sacrificing her wants, her needs, her very life. At present, it means driving a wedge between herself and Julian. She knows that romantic love between parabatai is cursed, and she simply can’t put Julian, the backbone of his family, through something so horrific, no matter how much they might love each other.

As for Julian, he is tormented by his feelings for Emma, the distance she’s putting between them, as well as the all-consuming need to keep his family safe. Safe from the increasing number of sea demons around them, safe from the Centurions who’ve all but invaded the Institute, safe from the knowledge that their Uncle Arthur, the official head of the Institute, is going mad and Julian’s been running things since he was a boy of twelve. It’s a lot for Julian to take in, but he’ll do anything for his family…even something like journey into Faerieland, something expressly forbidden by the Clave (Shadowhunters’ governing body).

Mark Blackthorn, Julian’s half-faerie brother, has received news that his former lover, Kieran, is about to be killed by the Unseelie King (who also happens to be Kieran’s father). Mark is determined to rescue Kieran, but he will not make the journey alone. Julian, Emma, and Christina, a trusted friend, accompany him, and the quest is just as fraught with danger as they feared it would be. With the help of the Seelie Court, they make it out alive, but they’ve made a dangerous enemy in the Unseelie King…and a dangerous ally in the Seelie Queen.

Back home at the Los Angeles Institute, those remaining are dealing with their own fight. Certain members of the Centurion force are poised to take over the Institute in an effort to further their own hateful agenda. This band of zealots wants to exert power over all Downworlders, and they think taking down the Blackthorn family is the way to do it. While this extremist group, known as the Cohort, is plotting, the Institute residents are also dealing with the unexpected return of a figure they thought was gone…Malcolm Fade himself.

As it turns out, it’s pretty difficult to kill a warlock, and Malcolm isn’t as dead as they had hoped. He’s returned, bringing an army of demons with him, and he remains determined to complete what he was trying to do before his untimely demise. With the help of the Black Volume, he plans to raise Annabell Blackthorn from the dead, and he won’t let anything get in his way. Annabell, however, may have other ideas.

Forced to flee the LA Institute, the younger Blackthorn siblings, Kit Herondale, and their tutor portal to the London Institute. There, they eventually join up with Emma, Julian, Mark, Christina, and Kieran (along with a couple of other familiar faces). They’re dealing with enemies on many sides, but they know they must prevail. They may have to make deals that are untenable, fight those who seem to be unbeatable, and put aside their own complicated feelings. The important thing is that they stay alive, put an end to the dangerous sentiments against Downworlders, and avoid war with the Unseelie King. Unfortunately, all of those things are easier said that done.


I’m going to stop there before I give too much more away. I’ve probably spoiled a lot here, but there is so much more to this book than I could have possibly touched on in one blog post (unless I wanted to spend the rest of the day writing…which I don’t). Lord of Shadows is a 700-page whopper, and every page is packed with something important, exciting, mysterious, infuriating, revealing, and, at points, tragic. The stuff I’ve touched on above is only a fraction of the wonderfully twisted story contained within this book.

Anyone who reads Lord of Shadows (or any of the Shadowhunter books, really) will find parallels to the world we live in today. No, we’re not dealing with demons, warlocks, faeries, or anything like that–that I know of–but we are dealing with discrimination and hatred of anything seen as different or “other.” In this book, a small but vocal group of extremists want warlocks to register, werewolves to be rounded up and put in camps, vampires to have their blood supply monitored, and faeries, for the most part, to be completely wiped out. The Shadowhunters who sympathize with Downworlders are viewed as traitors. Sound familiar? Once again, fantasy shines a light on the horrific reality we’re facing today and gives a glimpse of the destruction we could see if we allow such hatred to flourish. It’s sobering, to say the least.

So…where do we go from Lord of Shadows? The third book of The Dark Artifices, The Queen of Air and Darkness, isn’t expected to be released until sometime in 2019. Given how Lord of Shadows ended, the wait for book three may very well drive me insane.

On a positive note, there is another Shadowhunter series being introduced a bit sooner. Chain of Gold, the first book of The Last Hours, should be out in 2018. This series is set in 1903, and it centers around the generation following the events of The Infernal Devices series. There’s also an adult series focusing on Magnus Bane and Alec Lightwood, The Eldest Curses, on the horizon, as well as another YA series, The Wicked Powers, that will pick up at the end of The Dark Artifices. I know it’s a lot to take in, but this is nothing but good news if you’re a superfan of the Shadowhunter books.

For more information on Lord of Shadows and all things Shadowhunter, visit Cassie Clare’s website, Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook. If you’re not a fan already, I hope you come to love this world as much as I do!

Supergirl at Super Hero High

Notice: While it’s not 100% necessary to read Wonder Woman at Super Hero High, the first book in Lisa Yee’s DC Super Hero Girls series, before reading the second installment, it is a pretty good idea. Not only does it help to establish the world of these novels, it also focuses on Wonder Woman. Isn’t that reason enough to read it? (Yes, it is.)

If it’s not already obvious, the second book in the DC Super Hero Girls series focuses on Supergirl. Now, you may think you know Kara Zor-El from the awesome Supergirl TV series or even the older movie (which brings on a sense of nostalgia in me), but you might want to think again. In this book, we get a look at a teen Supergirl, a girl dealing with being not only the new kid in school but the new kid on the planet. Her home planet of Krypton was destroyed, and everything and everyone she knew–including her parents–are gone. That’s a lot for a normal kid to take in. Throw in some brand-new superpowers, and things get much more complicated.

Kara Zor-El never really wanted to be a superhero. One minute, she was a happy kid on Krypton, enjoying life with her loving parents. The next minute, she was strapped into a spacecraft and sent off into the great unknown while her parents, her planet, and everything familiar to her was destroyed. She landed on Earth, and two wonderful people, Martha and Jonathan Kent, took her in…much like they had done for another Kryptonian years ago.

Now, Kara is facing even more change in her life. Thanks to Earth’s yellow sun, she’s dealing with some pretty intense superpowers–heat vision, super strength, flight, super speed, and much more. Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, Kara is a tad clumsy, and managing her newfound abilities is becoming something of a hazard to those around her. What she needs is a place to learn how to control her powers and how she can use her gifts to help the world around her. That’s where Super Hero High comes in!

At Super Hero High, Kara, now known by the name of Supergirl, immediately feels like the odd person out. Everyone here, especially her hero Wonder Woman, seems to already know so much. They don’t trip over their own feet or cause mayhem and destruction with their out-of-control powers. Supergirl is overwhelmed by how much she has to learn, and she often wonders if this place is even right for her. A new friend, Barbara Gordon, and a cookie-wielding librarian, Granny Goodness, try to reassure Supergirl, but her doubts continue to plague her.

When a mysterious threat begins to target Super Hero High, the students and staff work together to determine who–or what–is attempting to infiltrate their school. Supergirl wants to help, but what can she do? Sometimes she thinks she just makes things worse. But when the true nature of this threat is revealed, Supergirl–with an assist from Barbara–may be the only one capable of neutralizing this menace for good.

Can Supergirl find the confidence she needs to face this danger head-on? And can she finally find her place at Super Hero High?


Like Wonder Woman at Super Hero High, this book is an ideal fit for upper elementary and middle grade collections. (I assume that this will also be true of the remainder of the series.) It’s a fun, inviting book that gives readers a glimpse into what life may be like for some of their favorite teen superheroes. It also lets readers know that they’re not alone when they feel out-of-place, lacking in confidence, lonely, or clumsy. Superheroes deal with the same stuff we all do.

Spoilers ahead! While I thoroughly enjoyed Supergirl at Super Hero High, I do have one (not totally serious) issue with it. I just have to ask one question. Why did it have to be the librarian? Why, I ask you?! Sure, some in my profession could have super-villain tendencies, but most of us are awesome. I, personally, vow to use my powers for good and never get my students to help me take over the world. I can only hope my fellow librarians feel the same way.

If the DC Super Hero Girls series seems like something you or your kids, students, or library patrons would enjoy, have no fear! There are at least two more volumes to love. In addition to Wonder Woman and Supergirl, Batgirl at Super Hero High is already out. (I’ll be reading this one soon.) Book four, Katana at Super Hero High will be released on July 4th. Given how popular these books are, I have high hopes that we’ll see even more books in this wonderful series.

For more information on Supergirl at Super Hero High and the series as a whole, visit author Lisa Yee’s website. Happy reading!

The Dark Prophecy

Warning: At the very least, read The Hidden Oracle, book one in The Trials of Apollo, before proceeding. If you really want to catch up, though, read all the books in the Percy Jackson and the Olympians and The Heroes of Olympus series as well.

I finished reading The Dark Prophecy, the second book in Rick Riordan’s The Trials of Apollo series, on Monday. I had every intention of writing up a post on it that day. As you’ve noticed, that didn’t work out. Thanks to after school meetings, household chores, season finales of my favorite shows, and general end-of-school-year stress, I didn’t have the time or energy to focus on a blog post. Probably a lame excuse to some, but that’s all I’ve got.

At any rate, I’m here now, and I want to briefly discuss The Dark Prophecy. I’ll try to steer clear of too many spoilers, but that may be unavoidable. We’ll see how it goes.

When last we left Apollo, now known as Lester Papadopoulous, he had just been through the wringer at good ol’ Camp Half-Blood. He managed to save the one of his oracles, the Grove of Dodona, but he is no closer to regaining his godly status. Meg McCaffrey, the demigod who controls Apollo’s fate, seemingly betrayed him to her evil jerk of a stepfather, Nero (known affectionately as “the Beast”). Apollo also had to fight the Colossus Neronis, who nearly destroyed Camp Half-Blood.

Now, with the help of Leo Valdez and Calypso, recently returned from their island exile on Ogygia, Apollo has to rescue yet another oracle before Nero and company take over the world. The next oracle to be saved, the Oracle of Trophonius, is in Indianapolis. When Apollo, Leo, and Calypso arrive in Indianapolis, they discover more than just another bad guy trying to take over the world. They find a place of refuge, some blasts from the past, and people (and other assorted beings) willing to either kill them or provide a bit of help. Sometimes, it’s difficult to tell which is which.

As usual, the tasks ahead won’t be easy. Our heroes meet all sorts of nefarious types on this quest: extremely polite Blemmyae who still want to kill them, various deities who may or may not want to see Apollo taken down a peg or two, a bloodthirsty villain who thinks very highly of himself, and battle ostriches. (That last thing sounds kind of cool, to be perfectly honest.) Apollo will have to use every tool and trick in his arsenal to come out on top in the many fights ahead of him. But he won’t be alone…

In addition to Leo and Calypso, Apollo is joined by the guardians of the Waystation, a haven with what seems to be its own consciousness. He also reunites with Meg McCaffrey. Apollo doesn’t know if he can totally trust her, but his fate is tied to her, so he doesn’t have a whole lot of choice. There’s also the Hunters of Artemis, some rescued demigods, a snake-lady, a couple of griffins, and an elephant named Olivia. With all of this awesome assistance, saving the Oracle of Trophonius should be easy-peasy, right? Yeah…not so much.

While Apollo is trying to figure out just how to accomplish the tasks in front of him, he’s forced to examine his previous actions. Did what he did in his godly past in some way lead to what is happening now? Can he possibly atone for his mistakes without putting his current form in mortal peril? (That part may be kind of tricky.)


If you loved The Hidden Oracle, you’ll likely feel the same way about The Dark Prophecy. Even with all the darkness facing Apollo and friends, they react with the same humor and snark that we’ve come to know and love. And although Apollo is often his somewhat narcissistic self, he’s reflecting on his past and dealing with the many mistakes he made. He may not want to be mortal, but he is coming to terms with his own humanity and the impact he’s had on others.

Going back to the humor Rick Riordan is known for, let’s not forget the extremely entertaining haiku peppered throughout this book. Once more, each chapter begins with its own haiku foreshadowing what’s about to happen, which is way more fun than simple chapter titles. I look forward to seeing more of this in the next books.

Speaking of the next books, there will be three more volumes in The Trials of Apollo. Book three, The Burning Maze, is set to be released on May 1st, 2018, and I’m fairly certain we’ll see some of our friends from Camp Jupiter in this one. Not to mention a certain satyr companion that needs no introduction.

While we wait impatiently on the next book, take a peek at Rick Riordan’s website. Also, if you haven’t already, read the first two books in his Magnus Chase series. The third book, The Ship of the Dead, comes out on October 3rd.

An Ember in the Ashes

Brutal. That word sums up Sabaa Tahir’s An Ember in the Ashes better than a long blog post ever could. Is that going to stop me from giving you more words? No, but be prepared. This book is no happy-go-lucky stroll through a meadow. It’s dark, savage, and, at times, difficult to read.

An Ember in the Ashes–the first book in the series–is loosely based on ancient Rome, but it’s also extremely relevant to the sometimes terrifying world we live in today. When you read it, I’m confident you’ll see the parallels.

Laia lives under the thumb of the Martial Empire. Born a Scholar, Laia and her family are treated as less than human. They live in constant fear of the Masks, deadly soldiers who seek out and eliminate those who would defy the Empire.

One night, the Empire’s minions come for Laia’s brother. A vicious Mask kills Laia’s grandparents and takes her brother prisoner. Laia’s only salvation is running and hiding in the city’s catacombs. It is here that she meets up with the Resistance.

These rebels seek to end the Empire’s reign of terror, and Laia hopes that they will help to free her brother. They agree, but Laia must do something for them first–something that could put her life in more peril than ever. She must become a spy and live as the Commandant’s slave at the Blackcliff Academy, the training ground for Masks.

Elias is in his final year of Mask training. He is one step away from becoming one of the Empire’s most savage weapons…and he wants no part of it. He can’t stand everything he’s forced to do, and he hates the brutality that surrounds him. Elias has plans to desert, but those plans are put on hold when he learns that he’s meant to go along a different path, one that could lead to the freedom he’s wanted for so long. Freedom from both the Empire and his mother, the cruel Commandant of Blackcliff.

As Laia looks for a way to save her brother, Elias is attempting to find his own way to escape his destiny. The two young people meet and are immediately drawn to each other, even though they appear to be at odds. They may seem to be working at cross-purposes, but they do not yet realize just how similar their goals are.

Both Laia and Elias, in their own way, seek to thwart the Empire, and, in the end, they may just have to join forces to realize their desires…and save their own lives.


There is nothing light-hearted about An Ember in the Ashes, but I loved it just the same. It is an uncomfortable, nightmarish read, but it definitely makes a reader think. It made me reflect on the rise and fall of empires throughout history, rebellions in both reality and fiction, and what it takes to overthrow what seems to be an all-powerful regime. (Pretty easy to see how this connects to what’s happening right now, yes?)

I would recommend An Ember in the Ashes to young adult and adult audiences. In my opinion, some of the imagery is simply too brutal for younger readers. The somewhat lackadaisical reactions to rape and torture, for example, make this book (and probably the others in the series) more suited to mature readers.

Speaking of the rest of the series, book two, A Torch Against the Night, is already out. From what I understand, there will be a third book and maybe a fourth book, but I don’t know titles or release dates yet.

To learn more about An Ember in the Ashes and Sabaa Tahir, visit the author’s website. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. You may also want to take a look at the completely unspoilery book trailer below.

The Siren

The Siren, a stand-alone novel by Kiera Cass, has been on my to-read pile for almost a year. I don’t know why I put it off for so long–especially considering how much I enjoyed Cass’ Selection series and how beautiful the cover is–but I finally made time for it over my holiday break. I intended to finish it before school started back up, but that didn’t work out. And starting back to school was so exhausting that I didn’t have the energy to do much more than fall on my face until this weekend. But I did manage to finish The Siren last night, and, while it didn’t grip me quite as much as The Selection, it was an intriguing book that took a new look at an enthralling mythical creature.

Eighty years ago, the Ocean saved Kahlen from certain death. In return, Kahlen agreed to serve the Ocean as a Siren for the next one hundred years. Along with her sisters, Kahlen used her Siren song to ensnare unsuspecting seafarers, dragging them to their deaths, feeding the Ocean the souls She needed to survive. Though Kahlen was troubled by what she had to do, she knew that she was helping the Ocean, the only mother figure she could really remember.

Now, with twenty years left in service to the Ocean, Kahlen wonders if a “normal” life is possible for her, especially when she meets Akinli, a guy that enchants her from their first encounter. Even though she can’t speak to him, they still manage to communicate and form a special friendship, one that even distance cannot dull.

Kahlen knows that holding onto Akinli is unwise–even dangerous–but she can’t let go of him. After a particularly troubling “assignment” from the Ocean, Kahlen seeks refuge with Akinli and discovers that spending every day with someone she loves is her idea of paradise. Could they possibly make a real relationship work, even with Kahlen’s commitment to the Ocean? Or will circumstances drive them apart once again? (If you answered “yes” to that last question, you were spot on.)

Although she knows she’s doing what she must, Kahlen is tortured by her separation from Akinli. With every passing day, she grows weaker, and no one, including the Ocean, seems to know why. As a Siren, Kahlen should be totally indestructable, so what could possibly be wrong with her?

Her sisters search the world over for an answer to Kahlen’s mysterious illness, but the truth could lie with the one being who claims to love Kahlen more than anything. What is the Ocean hiding, and can Kahlen convince Her to let go before it’s too late–for both Kahlen and the boy she loves?


The Siren is a somewhat convoluted love story, especially when you throw the whole my-voice-can-kill-you thing on top of it. I didn’t totally buy how quickly Kahlen and Akinli fell for each other, but that could just be my issue.

And another thing–the Ocean seemed to be the very definition of an abusive jerk, in my opinion. I’m only threatening to kill you and destroy everything you care about because I love you. Ugh. And the Sirens are still devoted to Her. I get that they didn’t have much choice–and they did call Her on her crap eventually–but really?

Aside from those issues, I did find The Siren to be an enjoyable, if sometimes aggravating, read. I would recommend it for middle grade and YA collections.

For more information on The Siren or other books by Kiera Cass, visit the author’s website, Twitter, or Facebook. You may also want to take a look at the official book trailer for The Siren below.

Stealing Snow

Last night, I finished reading Danielle Paige’s latest novel, Stealing Snow, which is a retelling of The Snow Queen. I figured that, since I adored Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series, I would be equally enamored of her new book. That wasn’t exactly how things worked out.

I did enjoy some elements of Stealing Snow, but I like the Dorothy Must Die books much more. It may have something to do with the subject matter. I’m much more familiar with the Land of Oz than I am with the story of the Snow Queen. (Most of what I know about the Snow Queen comes from Frozen, and I think we can all agree that movie doesn’t come close to the original story.) The convoluted love story also didn’t really work for me. I liked the twist at the end of the book, and I fully intend to read the rest of the series, but Stealing Snow wasn’t as great as I wanted it to be.

When Snow Yardley was just a little girl, her mother sent her to live at Whittaker, a psychiatric facility for “troubled” youth. Snow doesn’t think she’s crazy, but she can’t deny that she has odd dreams and a tendency to be filled with icy anger. (It’s hard not to be angry when you’ve been locked in an asylum for most of your life.) Her only friend at Whittaker is Bale, but even that is taken from when he turns violent shortly after their first kiss.

Snow can’t explain Bale’s sudden violence–and even more sudden disappearance–but maybe there’s someone out there who can. A new orderly at Whittaker tells Snow that there’s a world that lies beyond these walls, and all she has to do to claim it is meet him at the Tree that haunts her dreams. But how can this be possible, and what does it have to do with Bale?

Snow eventually finds a way to escape Whittaker and find the Tree in question. Beyond the Tree lies the mysterious land of Algid. Snow doesn’t know quite what to make of this strange world…or her place in it. Algid is ruled by King Lazar, a brutal, powerful man…who is also Snow’s father. According to prophecy, Snow will soon overthrow her father or join him, making his hold on Algid even more absolute.

Snow isn’t convinced of all that’s being thrown at her, but she has to play along if she has any hope of finding Bale. At the very least, she needs to learn to control her newly discovered powers. As her name suggests, Snow has the power to control snow.

Snow needs to use her new power against the King’s minions, and several interested parties want to help her do just that. There’s the River Witch, who has her own reasons for wanting King Lazar out of power. There’s Kai, a boy who can be standoffish but who Snow feels connected to. And there’s Jagger, the boy who posed as an orderly at Whittaker, and his band of Robbers. Snow doesn’t know who to trust, but she’ll do whatever it takes to save Bale…even if she’s not entirely certain anymore that he’s the love of her life.

Like it or not, Snow is tied to the future of Algid, and a day is coming that will reveal to her more than she ever wanted to know. She’ll discover hard truths about Bale, her parents, herself, and what she needs to do to control her own fate.


As I said before, I wanted this book to be so much more than it was. It felt kind of disjointed at times, and the “love rectangle” really got on my nerves. Snow’s back-and-forth between Bale, Kai, and Jagger was grating and often nonsensical. I get why she was connected to Bale, but she just met Kai and Jagger. I didn’t see any reason for her to be all swoony over them. They could have been complete psychopaths for all she knew. (Of course, Bale had his share of psychotic moments, and she was nuts over him.) I just wanted to reach through the pages, shake Snow, and tell her to deal with her own issues without worrying about all these guys. I mean, seriously, she had enough problems without the male of the species making things more confusing. (And that last sentence may as well be my own personal philosophy on getting through life.)

Anyhoo, Stealing Snow, despite its flaws, was an enjoyable read. I liked the curveball at the end of the book. (No, I’m not going to tell you what it was.) That surprise made up for a lot and made me want to read more of this series.

Speaking of the series as a whole, there are two prequel novellas that are already available. The first, Before the Snow, tells more about the River Witch and her connection to King Lazar. The second, Queen Rising, gives a closer look at Margot, queen of the Robbers. Since I found both of those characters to be quite interesting in Stealing Snow, I’ll give those two stories a read very soon. The second full-length novel, which is currently untitled, will be out sometime in 2017.

If you’d like more information on Stealing Snow and Danielle Paige’s other books, visit the author’s website. You can also connect with her on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Snapchat, and Goodreads.