Denton Little’s Deathdate

What would you do if you knew the exact date of your death? I like to think I’d do all the stuff I was too scared, inhibited, or lazy to do normally, but I know myself well enough to realize that’s probably not how things would play out. The more likely scenario is that I would read as much as possible and take lots of naps. Know thyself, my friends.

I say all that to introduce my latest read, Denton Little’s Deathdate. In this morbidly funny book, our title character ponders what to do before he kicks the bucket. As a matter of fact, most people in the world deal with this big question. Thanks to an “advance” in medical technology, everyone knows his/her deathdate. They don’t know the exact minute or how they’re going to die, but the date appears to be set in stone. For seventeen-year-old Denton Little, that date is just a couple days away, and he’s got a lot to process before the big day.

Two days before his deathdate, Denton Little wakes up in a strange bed with his very first (and possibly last) hangover. Why is he in his best friend’s sister’s bed? He remembers flashes of the previous night, but most of it is a blur. Did something awesome happen with Veronica, or did he embarrass himself completely…or both?

Eventually, Denton Little manages to piece together some semblance of last night’s events, but he’s got other things to worry about today. For one thing, he has to get ready for his funeral. Oh joy. A night for everyone to say how sorry they are that he’ll no longer be with them. A night in which he has to make a speech and dole out hugs to relatives, friends, and treasured acquaintances. Denton can hardly wait.

Another thing worrying Denton in his last hours is the weird purple rash that is spreading all over his body. Did his activities with Veronica give him some sort of disease, or is it something else? Whatever it is, his entire body is turning purple, and it seems that he’s spreading this unknown virus to anyone he–ahem–shares saliva with. (There are a couple more people on that list than there should be, especially considering that Denton has a girlfriend whose name is most definitely not Veronica.)

To make things even more confusing for Denton, a weird guy shows up at his funeral, claims to have information about Denton’s mother, a woman who died shortly after giving birth to Denton, and warns Denton to beware of government officials. What could this guy want now, and how could this make any difference to Denton when he’s only got hours to live? And what could the government have to do with Denton or his mother? It’s quite the puzzle, and Denton’s running out of time to solve it.

Join Denton as he and his friends try to piece together what’s going on around them. What’s up with the weird purple rash? What does Denton’s mom have to do with his deathdate? And is there a way for Denton to cheat death when no one else has managed to? It’s a mystery…


Here’s a major spoiler if you’re still reading this post: Denton lives. I don’t feel too bad about revealing that since there is a second book to look forward to. The title itself could be considered spoilery to those who haven’t done their homework. It’s Denton Little’s Still Not Dead, and it was released in February. Given that book one ended on a pretty large cliffhanger, I’m hoping to make time to read book two as soon as possible.

Denton Little’s Deathdate is a nominee for the 2017-18 South Carolina Young Adult Book Award. Often, titles on this list are appropriate for middle grade readers. In my opinion, this is not one of those titles. Denton Little’s Deathdate is an awesome book, but I don’t think it’s a good fit for tweens and younger teens. It has a fair amount of sexy times and innuendo, alcohol and drug use, and irreverent humor (which is my favorite part of the book), and all of those things combined make it more suited to a mature teen audience. Before you recommend this book to younger teens, read it for yourself. You likely know best which of your readers are ready for a book like this and which aren’t.

To learn more about Denton Little’s Deathdate, visit author Lance Rubin’s cool, fun website. You can also connect with the author on Twitter and Instagram. For an extra bit of fun, check out the video below featuring Lance Rubin singing a lovely song about Denton Little’s Deathdate. The song alone makes me want to read everything this guy cares to write. Enjoy!

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Royce Rolls

I’m typically not one to watch “reality” television (with the exception of Survivor). I don’t care about keeping up with anyone, any sort of dynasties, or housewives from major cities. I see enough on social media to know that there’s not much that’s real about these shows, and I prefer my celebrities to have actual talent.

I tell you all of this to introduce my latest read, Royce Rolls by Margaret Stohl. This book is, of course, fiction, but it takes readers behind the scenes of what life on a “reality” show may be like. The action revolves around Bentley Royce, middle child in the family featured on Rolling with the Royces. It’s almost immediately clear that the Bentley shown to the public is nothing like the real girl, and she’s growing tired of the charade. If only her family felt the same way.

Bentley Royce has spent much of her life in front of cameras. It kind of goes with the territory when your family is the subject of the number two reality show in the nation. But Rolling with the Royces is in trouble. Cancellation looms, and Bentley is hopeful that this could be her chance to live life on her own terms instead of following the network’s idea of who she should be.

But the Royces have never been a family to go down without a fight. Bentley’s momager, Mercedes, is ruthless and will stop at nothing to get her family back on top. Her older sister, Porsche, isn’t much better. Bentley’s only possibly ally is her younger brother, Bach, but he’s dealing with his own problems with gambling.

While Bentley longs for freedom from the insanity around her, she quickly realizes that it’s not that simple. Without the show, who are the Royces? The family could very well crumble without the show keeping them afloat, and that’s simply not acceptable to Bentley. So she’ll do what she must–including embracing the Bad Bentley character the public seems to love–to ensure that her family stays on the air.

As Bentley is giving the paparazzi a show, her sister has her own idea for avoiding the show’s demise. What else but a celebrity wedding? Porsche announces that she’s getting married (to a guy that no one knows anything about), and the family drama gets even more insane. Now, Porsche is planning the wedding of the century, Mercedes is shooting daggers at her future son-in-law, and Bach’s gambling addiction is worse than ever.

It seems, as always, it’s up to Bentley to get things back on track. But how can she keep her family in the spotlight while stepping out of it herself? Is there any way out of this mess? Who can she turn to for help? In a world that never looks below the surface, can she find anyone that sees and supports the real Bentley Royce?

Discover just how far one resourceful, desparate girl will go to save herself and her family when you read Royce Rolls, the latest book by best-selling author Margaret Stohl.


Whether you love or hate reality television, Royce Rolls definitely makes you think a bit more about what you’re watching. In turns both hilarious and serious, this book makes it abundantly clear that what we often see on screen is not even remotely real. That doesn’t mean, however, that the people on these shows aren’t dealing with very real problems. I couldn’t handle cameras in my face 24/7, and I now have a little more empathy for those who do. (That doesn’t mean I like–or even respect–any of them, but I get that their seemingly charmed lives may not be as easy as they appear.)

Royce Rolls is a great book for people who both love and loathe reality TV, particularly Keeping Up with the Kardashians…which had to be the inspiration for most of the book’s characters. I would recommend this book to a high school audience, but it should be fine for mature middle school students as well.

If I have one complaint about this book, it would be the footnotes. From what I gather, they are production notes, but that isn’t clear at the beginning of the book, so I find them distracting and not altogether necessary.

For more information on Royce Rolls and others by the fabulous Margaret Stohl, check out the author’s website. You also definitely need to take a look at this totally awesome book trailer for Royce Rolls.

Yes Please

Occasionally, I like to take a little break from my standard fare of children’s, middle grade, and YA literature. That break generally takes the form of a romance novel or a memoir. This time, I chose to read a memoir, specifically Yes Please by Amy Poehler.

This book could be classified in a number of ways: nonfiction, autobiography, humor, and, of course, memoir. What I’d like to emphasize here, though, is that it is a book for adults. Unlike most of the other books I feature here, this is not a read that belongs in a YA collection. Are there certain elements that will appeal to teens? Sure. But this is a book written for adults and should be treated as such. It contains frank talk of marriage, sex, drug use, being a woman in a male-dominated industry, parenthood, and simply navigating life.

Now, all that being said, I did like Yes Please. It wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, but I guess that’s a good thing. I started this book thinking that I would be getting something similar to Tina Fey’s Bossypants (which I loved). To a certain extent, that’s what I got, but there was also a more serious side to Poehler’s book. It wasn’t the laugh-out-loud experience that I anticipated. Sure, there were moments of hilarity, but, at least in my opinion, the book was more about Poehler reflecting on what led her to where she is today.

Amy Poehler takes readers through her admittedly wonderful childhood, through her early days in improv, on to her time with the Upright Citizens Brigade, SNL, and Parks and Recreation. She paints a very vivid picture of how difficult and exhilarating it was to be a young comedian in both Chicago and New York, and she doesn’t shy away from the–in my eyes–darker aspects of the world she inhabited. There was a great deal of partying and lots of drug use, and Poehler did her share of both.

Things began to change for Poehler when she got married and became a mother. In this book, she talks more about the latter than the former. She only briefly glances on her divorce from Will Arnett (which I totally understand), but the love she has for her two boys pours from this book. It’s clear that those boys are adored by their mother…but also that she works to make time for herself. She admits that she has no desire to be a stay-at-home mom, and she cautions women to stop shaming each other for their choices. Her motto of “Good for you, not for me” is one that could serve us all…and maybe help some people to mind their own business.

I like to think I know a fair amount about the entertainment industry, but I have to admit that I’m not familiar with a lot of the names Poehler dropped in this book (and she dropped a lot of them). I knew some of them simply because I’ve watched Saturday Night Live for years, but others were completely new to me. I’m not sure what that says about me or this book, but I’m guessing other readers may also feel like they need to bone up on their “Who’s Who of Improv” after reading Yes Please.

Aside from the name-dropping, if I had to make a complaint about this book, it would be that it felt a bit choppy. Poehler jumped from event to event and back again fairly regularly. I eventually got used to it, but the frequent back-and-forth was a bit jarring at times.

All in all, Yes Please was an enjoyable read, and I would recommend it to adult readers who want an inside look at the world of comedy, particularly how a young woman worked like mad, paid her dues, and went on to become one of the most beloved and recognized comedians in the world.

 

 

Hyperbole and a Half

Hyperbole and a Half has been on my staggering TBR pile for quite some time, and I finally finished it on Christmas Eve. Now that the craziness of the holidays has (mostly) passed, I can take a little time to tell you what I think of this funny, strange, and thoroughly relatable book.

*Disclaimer: Normally, my posts deal with books for middle grade or YA readers. This is not one of those. This book is intended for an adult audience.*

In this book, Allie Brosh takes her fantastic blog and transfers it to a book that, if I’d been reading it in a group of people, would have elicited some rather strange looks aimed my way. Many parts of it were laugh-out-loud funny. (The cartoons–some of which have earned Internet meme fame–only added to that.) I particularly enjoyed her near-constant battles with her dogs. Hilarious stuff.

Other parts of the book, however, made me think, “Wow. Someone out there gets me.” Brosh isn’t shy about addressing her depression or the terrible thoughts that sometimes invade her head. Anyone who deals with any form of depression or anxiety is sure to find something to relate to in Brosh’s work, and those who’ve ever wondered about the toll mental illness takes may just have their eyes opened a bit.

Of course, Hyperbole and a Half isn’t all about one woman’s battle with depression. It’s about her childhood, her family, her daily struggles with somewhat difficult pets, and simply navigating through life with some humor (and profanity). Who doesn’t need a little of that?!

If you’re a fan of the Bloggess (who wrote Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and Furiously Happy), I suggest you give Hyperbole and a Half (both the blog and the book) a try. This book is a quick read that I think lots of adult readers will enjoy…if they haven’t already. (Apparently, I’m a little late to the party on this one. Oh well. Better late than never.)

The Terrible Two Get Worse

This time last year, I had the opportunity to read a hilariously funny book from the team of Jory John, Mac Barnett, and Kevin Cornell. That book was The Terrible Two. As soon as the book was released, it earned a place on my library shelves, and, to be honest, I haven’t seen it since. (My students know a good book when they see one.)

Now, almost a year later, I’ve been lucky enough to read the sequel to The Terrible Two, aptly named The Terrible Two Get Worse. (Thank you, NetGalley!) This second installment will be released a month from tomorrow, and, just like its predecessor, it will be added to my school library as soon as I can manage it.

I must confess that I liked the first book in this series more than the second, but the sequel still managed to keep me chuckling and eager to turn the page. It’s a quick read that will definitely appeal to any budding pranksters or anyone who enjoys a good laugh.

Miles and Niles make up the Terrible Two, the most excellent pranking team Yawnee Valley has ever seen. Their legendary pranks are sure to be recorded in the history books of the International Order of Disorder, especially since their primary target is Principal Barry Barkin (and his insufferable bully of a son, Josh).

Unfortunately for Miles and Niles–and Principal Barkin–the pranking has come to the attention of the school board. They wonder if Principal Barkin has what it takes to run the school if he can’t figure out who’s pulling so many pranks and bring them to justice. It doesn’t help that the former principal, who happens to be Barry Barkin’s father, agrees with the school board and decides to take matters into his own hands.

Now, Miles and Niles have to contend with a new leader in their school, Principal Bertrand Barkin, and this guy is not messing around. He vows to put an end to pranks…once and for all.

At first, the Terrible Two figure they can get something over on this new guy, but the elder Barkin proves to be one tough customer. He simply doesn’t react to any of their pranks, and what good is a prank without a reaction?! Pretty soon, pranks are a thing of the past at the Yawnee Valley Science and Letters Academy, and Miles and Niles simply don’t know what to do with themselves. Something’s gotta give, right?

The Terrible Two eventually figure out what they must do to end Bertrand Barkin’s reign of terror…but they’ll need some help. That help, though, may have to come from an unexpected source. Could Miles and Niles possibly–*gasp*–join forces with their former principal, one Barry Barkin, to prank someone who is virtually unprankable? Find out when you read The Terrible Two Get Worse!

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As with The Terrible Two, this second book is a perfect book for any reader with a bit of a mischievous side. The text and illustrations mesh perfectly, and the book also emphasizes such important concepts as creativity, teamwork, perseverance, and friendship.

I would say that The Terrible Two Get Worse is highly recommended for any collection that serves readers from 4th grade on up. Some of the humor resonates more with older readers than with kids, but there’s definitely something here for everyone. I, for one, am hoping that we’ll see even more Terrible Two stories in the future.

For more information about this awesome series and its creators, check out the websites of Jory John, Mac Barnett, and Kevin Cornell. And make sure to pick up your copy of The Terrible Two Get Worse on January 12th!

 

Furiously Happy

After following Jenny Lawson, the Bloggess, on her blog and Twitter and reading her first book, Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, I knew that I would absolutely read her second book, Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things, as soon as possible. (Also, who doesn’t want to read a book with a lovely, ecstatic, taxidermied raccoon on the cover? Who, I ask you?!) Well, “as soon as possible” turned out to be this week. (The book came out last week, so I guess I’m doing okay.)

Furiously Happy is a candid–and hilarious–look at Lawson’s own struggles with depression, anxiety, and a few other issues. As it turns out, I really needed that this week. Like this beautifully broken author, I also deal with depression and anxiety, and the depression hit me pretty hard this week. (And no, I cannot pinpoint why. That’s not really how depression works. At least, not for me.) This book was just what I needed to make me laugh until I cried and to let me know that I was not alone. I have a whole tribe of weirdos out there who are just like me. (Well, maybe not just like me. I don’t know of any other 36-year-old spinster librarians with depression and social anxiety who have a fondness for Star Wars, Doctor Who, and playing the tuba.)

If you have a somewhat twisted, irreverent sense of humor–or if you’re broken in your own particular way–I strongly suggest you read Furiously Happy. It’s crazy, uproariously funny, eye-opening, comforting, and just plain awesome. I love it.

For those who are still not convinced to read this amazing book, check out the video below. It brings me to tears–and gives me hope–each time I look at it.

*Note: Furiously Happy is NOT a YA book. I would not put it in a high school library or YA collection. This book, in my opinion, is meant for adult readers.*

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened

*Note to regular readers of this blog: This is not a YA/middle grade book. It’s a memoir (intended for adult-ish readers) packed with irreverent humor that the easily offended will not be happy with. (Those people need to lighten up.)*

Every once in a while, I have to put aside books that I just can’t get into and read something different. It’s usually because I need a break from the seriousness of many YA books…or I need a good laugh. The book I finished last night, Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir by Jenny Lawson (also known as the Bloggess), definitely qualifies as different…and it was so over-the-top hilarious that I’m still laughing.

When even the dedication page makes you laugh-snort, you know you’ve got a winner.

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It just got better–and weirder–from there.

Now, I’ve only been reading Jenny’s blog, The Bloggess, for a short time, but I still thought I knew what to expect in this book. Yeah…not so much. From her childhood in rural West Texas, through her struggles with anxiety both as a teen and an adult, and her life with her daughter and husband, Jenny addresses just about everything with irreverent humor and her own brand of crazy. I loved it, and I laughed so much that I gave myself a headache and had to take some Advil and a nap.

I’m not going to go into everything I liked about this book. I don’t have that kind of time. But, if you think you might be interested in reading Let’s Pretend This Never Happened–and learning more about taxidermy, impregnating a cow, sadistic turkeys, couch etiquette, the wild world of working in human resources, or what it’s like in the head of someone with an anxiety disorder–you might want to check out Jenny’s blog first. If the Bloggess seems to float your boat (and you’re not easily offended), you should definitely read this memoir. I don’t usually even read memoirs, but I’m now recommending this one to every crazy person I know. (And there are a lot of us. I work in public education. I’m pretty sure being medicated is now a job requirement.)

After reading this insane (in a good way) book, I feel like Jenny Lawson and I could be great friends…who never meet and only communicate via email/social media because our anxiety issues make actual physical meetings awkward and unpleasant. Welcome to the blogging community. We’re great in print.

If you’d like to learn more about Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and the Bloggess, check out Jenny’s blog (obviously), Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest. You’ll likely never be the same. You’re welcome.