The Queen of Oz

I’m one step closer to the end of Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series. I’ve just finished the final prequel novella, The Queen of Oz, and I’ll soon start reading the final full-length novel, The End of Oz. If you haven’t read all of the stories up to this point, you may want to turn back until you’ve caught up.

(While it’s not absolutely necessary to read all of the prequel novellas to get what’s going on in the novels, it does help tremendously. They add tons of context to what’s happening in Oz.)

Here are all of the stories in this series thus far:

Now let’s move on to The Queen of Oz

In this final novella, we learn more about Mombi’s origins and her connection to Ozma, the rightful ruler of Oz. Mombi wasn’t always the powerful witch we’ve come to know throughout the course of this series. As a matter of fact, she didn’t have much power at all…at first.

While a young witch, Mombi asks Glinda (who is actually quite horrible) to teach her everything she knows, but it doesn’t take long for Mombi to realize that Glinda isn’t about to teach anyone to be as powerful as she is. So Mombi strikes out on her own, and she’s soon given a very important task by Lurline, the fairy who founded Oz.

One day, a visitor arrives at Mombi’s home deep in the woods. It’s the Wizard, and he’s carrying a peculiar little bundle. He claims that the baby in his arms is his niece, and he charges Mombi with protecting the child until he can return for her.

Thanks to a dream encounter with Lurline, Mombi knows the truth about this child and has been preparing for the task before her. She knows this child is Ozma, the true heir to the throne of Oz, and it’s up to Mombi to protect her. There’s only one thing to do. She must use all the magic she’s learned to transform Ozma into something–no, someone–else. She doesn’t plan on Pete, though.

Pete has spent his entire life sequestered with Mombi. The old witch doesn’t seem to like him very much, but she’s still oddly protective of him. Pete does what he can to find momentary reprieve from his life with Mombi, and he dreams of a life of excitement and adventure. Eventually, those dreams and an encounter with an intriguing Munchkin drive Pete to find the Wizard in the hopes of being completely free of Mombi and her magic.

Pete couldn’t know, however, that someone was watching for him…someone far more dangerous than Mombi. Someone whose name rhymes with Blinda who wants to unlock the magic within Pete for her own nefarious purposes. With Glinda’s “help,” Ozma is finally returned to Oz, but she may not be quite as easy to control as the “Good Witch” would hope.


I’ve given way too much away here, and I apologize for that. There’s still a good bit to the story, so read for yourself to uncover the rest. Also, if you didn’t already know the connection between Ozma and Pete, you really have a lot of reading to do.

I’ll soon turn my attention to The End of Oz, the final installment in the Dorothy Must Die series. I have a few other books to finish first, but I’m hoping to get to this book by the end of April. Part of me is putting it off so that I can keep my enjoyment of the series going as long as possible. Another part really wants to see how things play out, especially as it concerns Glinda and Dorothy getting what’s coming to them. Stick with me here, and I’ll post my thoughts as soon as I finish the last book in this gripping series.

For more information on the entire Dorothy Must Die series and Danielle Paige, connect with the author on her website, Twitter, Goodreads, and Facebook.

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

My school’s faculty book club decided to read the works of Kate DiCamillo this month. Even though I’d already read Flora & Ulysses, I wanted to read a few more of DiCamillo’s books for our meeting (which is tomorrow afternoon). Well, I only got around to reading one more, but it’s one that had been near the top of my to-read list for a while. That book is The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. My third grade students have been reading this book in class for the past couple of years, so I figured it was a good pick–both for my book club and to discuss with my students.

Edward Tulane, a china rabbit with a posh life and a rather inflated view of himself, loves no one. He is adored, and that is enough for him. Edward, though, is about to take a somewhat unexpected adventure that will change everything. While traveling at sea with his owner, a sweet girl named Abilene, Edward is tossed overboard, and his real journey begins…

This once-pristine rabbit travels from the bottom of the ocean to a stinky garbage heap. From the backpack of a hobo to serving as a scarecrow in a field. From the loving arms of a sick little girl to dancing on the streets for pocket change. Through all of these circumstances–some good, some bad–Edward finally begins to understand what it truly means to love.

When Edward opens his heart to the joy, hope, and even pain of loving others, he may one day, miraculously find his way home.

_______________

When I first began reading this book, I didn’t expect a tale about a narcissistic toy rabbit to make me cry. How wrong I was. By the book’s conclusion, I was both mourning all of Edward’s losses and wishing for him to find a loving home. The ending of this unexpectedly emotional story had me at once jumping for joy and reaching for the tissues. I love it when that happens.

I can totally see why The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane is such a hit with my students. I just wish I’d read it sooner. I look forward to discussing this beautiful story with my book club tomorrow!

The Quilt Walk

When I first picked up The Quilt Walk by Sandra Dallas, I wasn’t exactly thrilled about reading it. (I wouldn’t have read it at all if it had not been one of this year’s SCCBA nominees.) I’ve never been a fan of westerns, thanks in part to being forced to watch shows like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, and others over the course of my life. My dad loves these shows, and he’s tried to develop an appreciation in me. It hasn’t worked.

Anyway, upon realizing that The Quilt Walk was about a girl moving west with her family, I was reluctant to start reading, but I persevered (because I had to), and I have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised. The main character was relatable, the action moved fairly quickly, and I was invested in the book’s outcome. I wanted the people on this journey to arrive safely at their destination and get a happy ending. (Spoilers: Not all of them did.) This book, which I didn’t initially want to read, grabbed ahold of me, and I found myself liking it more than I was prepared to.

The year is 1864, and Emmy Blue Hatchett has just learned that her family is leaving their safe home in Illinois to strike out for a new life in Golden, Colorado. While Emmy Blue is excited about the possibility of adventure, she doesn’t want to leave everything she’s ever known behind…and she knows her mother feels the same way. But they accept their new circumstances, and Emmy Blue, her parents, and her aunt and uncle set off for Colorado.

The family has to leave many things behind–and think of creative ways to take along what they need–but just before they leave, Emmy Blue is given some fabric pieces by her grandmother. Emmy Blue is not exactly happy with this gift. Unlike the other women in her family, Emmy Blue has no interest in quilting. She doesn’t understand the appeal of making perfect stitches and putting scraps of fabric together, but her mother convinces her to take her grandmother’s gift and put it together on their long trek to Colorado.

As Emmy Blue begins piecing her quilt together, often walking while she stitches, she takes in her surroundings and gets to know the people around her. She has long conversations with her father and mother, she makes a new friend when they join up with a wagon train, and she questions some of the cruelty she sees around her. She encounters dangers she never expected, she learns to set up camp and lead a team of oxen, and she even finds herself enjoying her quilt walk just a bit. On this long, perilous journey, Emmy Blue Hatchett is growing up and discovering just how strong both she and those around her really are.

Eventually, Emmy Blue and her family arrive at their destination…though not without some changes. Emmy Blue is a different person than the girl who left Illinois. Her quilt walk may be done, but her journey through life is just beginning.

_______________

When I return to school tomorrow (UGH!), I plan to share this book with several of my teachers. I think The Quilt Walk is a welcome addition to studies on Westward Expansion, especially considering the book is loosely based on an actual event in Colorado history. (More information about that is available in the author’s note.)

Readers my age may enjoy making connections between this book and that favorite computer game, Oregon Trail–which I never managed to make it all the way through. I always ended up with dysentery or something.

Another connection I had with this book was quilting. Now, I’ve never learned to quilt–to my great regret–but my great-grandmothers were excellent quilters, and they gave their creations to their families. Some of my most prized possessions are quilts made by my great-grandmothers. (My favorites are my Holly Hobbie and Strawberry Shortcake quilts, along with a very special one that includes both Jose Cuervo and Jingle Bells fabric scraps. I think I treasure that one because it’s so weird.) Who knows? Maybe this book will inspire a whole new generation of quilters. I could even take it up one of these days. Stranger things have happened.

The Quilt Walk is a book I’d highly recommend for any upper elementary or middle grade classroom or library. It’s a great book that tells of life in the “Wild West” and what that life may have been like for a young girl. Young readers may find it interesting to compare and contrast Emmy Blue’s experiences with their own. They may just find they have more in common than they thought possible.

If you’d like more information on The Quilt Walk, a 14-15 South Carolina Children’s Book Award nominee, and author Sandra Dallas, visit her website.