Yellow Brick War

Notice: Before reading the post below or Yellow Brick War, the third book in Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series, you must read the books and prequel novellas below. If you’re all caught up, proceed at will. If not, you’ve got some work to do.

With that out of the way, let’s move on to Yellow Brick War. I’m not going to do a big recap of the series up to this point. You can read my posts on the books above for that. Let’s just jump right in, shall we?

Once again, Amy Gumm has failed in her quest to kill Dorothy. Now, she and the Order of the Wicked are stranded in Kansas, the last place Amy ever wanted to see again…but there might be something hidden here–the silver slippers that Dorothy wore during her first visit to Oz–that could help them defeat Dorothy, Glinda, and their armies before both Oz and Kansas (known to Ozians as the Other Place) are destroyed once and for all. But how is Amy supposed to find a pair of shoes that have been hidden for years and that most people don’t think exist? Well, the answer is simple.

She has to go back to high school.

Amy is reluctant to return to the life she left behind, but it is her only option. She reunites with her mother–who has undergone a drastic change for the better–and she encounters Madison, the girl who tormented her all through school. Madison, too, has changed. She’s a teen mother dealing with her own struggles and facing ostracism by those who once kowtowed to her. She and Amy form an unlikely alliance, and Amy begins to wonder if coming back to her old life–for good–might really be possible after all.

But nothing is ever that simple when it comes to the battle for Oz…

While Amy is searching her high school for the slippers that will help her and the Wicked return to Oz–because of course these magic shoes are hidden in a Kansas high school–she encounters a terrifying figure that could be even more dangerous than Dorothy or Glinda. It’s the ancient Nome King, a powerful, dark creature who has plans of his own for Amy. Could he be the one manipulating everything happening in Oz? Is he somehow connected to Glinda’s grab for power or Dorothy’s return to Oz and her addiction to magic? Amy’s not sure what’s going on, but she does know that she must do whatever it takes to save both Oz and her home (a place that’s maybe not so bad after all).

With the silver slippers–or combat boots–in her possession, Amy and the Wicked make their return to Oz to discover that things are even bleaker than ever. War with both Glinda and Dorothy is imminent. Amy and friends must gather whatever forces they can if they have any hope of defeating their foes. Amy will have to tap into the dark magic that she finds both terrifying and exhilarating. But will it be enough?

Can Amy and the Wicked win against two enormously powerful fronts? What will be lost in the process? Who will provide help when they need it the most? Will Amy finally be able to kill Dorothy and return balance to Oz? Is a much larger threat just waiting in the wings?

Discover what awaits Amy and her Wicked friends when you read Yellow Brick War, the thrilling third book in Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series!


I’ve left soooo much out of what happens in this book. Just trust me when I say that it’s action-packed from start to finish–much like the rest of the series–and I am eager to see how things progress for Amy and company in the final book in the series, The End of Oz. This book is set to be released on February 22nd, 2017.

If February is just too darn far away for you, there are three more prequel novellas to look forward to. One of them, Order of the Wicked (novella 0.7), is already out, and I plan to read it as soon as finish a few other books-in-progress. The other two are not yet titled, and I’m not sure when they’ll be out. If the series stays true to form, they’ll be available before February.

For more information on this wonderful series and author extraordinaire Danielle Paige, connect with the author on her website, Twitter, Goodreads, and Facebook. You may also want to check out Epic Reads’ Yellow Brick War book trailer below. It’s pretty great.

Finally, Danielle Paige is scheduled to be at YALLFest again this year, so, if you’d like to attend this outstanding YA book festival in lovely Charleston, SC, this November, click here for more info. I hope to see you there!

The Seventh Wish

What do you get when you combine a wish-giving fish, Irish dancing, and drug addiction? You get The Seventh Wish, Kate Messner’s newest book. This book is weird, moving, and magical. It will be released this Tuesday, and it is at once fun and serious. Yes, there is a fantastical element to it, and it’s often entertaining to see how that plays out, but the book also deals with some difficult situations. Those situations are handled in a very real, accessible way, and it’s interesting to see how serious issues may be viewed through a child’s eyes.

Charlie doesn’t expect much from her ice fishing adventures with her friend and his grandmother. But when she comes across a fish that agrees to grant a wish in exchange for its freedom, Charlie reevaluates things. Maybe this fish can help Charlie, her friends, and her family get everything they’ve been hoping for.

As one could imagine, a girl isn’t going to let a wish-granting fish go to waste, so she puts it to good use. Charlie wishes for her mom to get a new job, for one friend to pass her English exam, for another to make the basketball team, and for a boy she likes to fall in love with her. Unfortunately, Charlie learns rather quickly that one must be extremely specific when speaking to a wish fish. Her wishes, however well-intended, are not turning out as she would have hoped.

Even with all of this wishing and fishing going on, Charlie still has to find time to work on her science project and practice her Irish dancing. A big dance competition is coming up, and she could have the opportunity to move up into a higher class. It’s a big deal, and Charlie has been psyching herself up for a while. She won’t let anything get in her way.

Sadly, something does happen that derails Charlie’s plans as well as everything she ever believed about her big sister. When it’s revealed that her sister, who’s been away at college, is having problems with heroin addiction, Charlie’s family–her whole world, really–changes. Everyone drops everything to help Charlie’s sister, and, while Charlie understands why, she’s also angry that she’s having to give up so much. Her dance competition, time with friends to work on their science project, and nearly everything else. Isn’t she important, too?

Charlie wonders if her wish fish could somehow help to make her sister and this horrible situation better. If she’s very careful with her words, maybe it could. Maybe her sister could come home and be the girl that Charlie always looked up to. It couldn’t hurt, right?

For a while, everything is going okay, but then something happens that shakes Charlie’s world once again, and Charlie knows that her wish fish can’t help with this one. Some things are just to big too let a little fish handle.


This book brings to mind the saying, “Be careful what you wish for.” Charlie’s wishes definitely get away from her, and she learns quickly that words have power. Some of the situations she found herself in were kind of funny. Others, as you’ve no doubt gathered, were heart-breaking.

Some adults may hesitate to put this book in elementary or middle school libraries because it deals with the topic of heroin addiction. Nothing is sugar-coated here, but I do think the topic is handled with care and empathy. Like it or not, some of our younger students deal with addiction as a daily part of their lives, and they need stories that show them that they’re not alone. I think The Seventh Fish is a book that speaks to students who’ve had siblings, parents, or friends suffering from addiction. I also think it might enlighten those who haven’t dealt with such a serious issue.

Will I be placing this book in my elementary school library? Yes, I will.

If you’d like to learn more about The Seventh Wish so that you can decide if it has a place in your school, classroom, public, or personal library, visit author Kate Messner’s website.

Many thanks to NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book a little early.

Red: The True Story of Red Riding Hood

Last year, I read Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin, and I immediately became a fan of author Liesl Shurtliff’s work. I promoted Rump to my teachers and students, and every copy of this book stays off my library shelves. (It didn’t hurt that Rump was a nominee for the 15-16 South Carolina Children’s Book Award and also served as one of my district’s Battle of the Books titles.)

Shurtliff’s second fairy tale retelling, Jack: The True Story of Jack & the Beanstalk, is almost as popular as Rump. In fact, Jack is so popular that I haven’t had a chance to check it out for myself yet. So when NetGalley gave me the opportunity to read Shurtliff’s latest book, Red: The True Story of Red Riding Hood, I jumped at the chance.

Those who’ve already read Rump know a little about the Red we meet in this novel. (She was Rump’s best friend, after all.) She is not like the Little Red Riding Hood we’ve grown up reading about. She is no sweet little miss who mistakes her grandma for a wily wolf. No, this girl is grumpy, self-sufficient, and crafty in her own right. But in Red, this young girl must face her fears while attempting to figure out what really makes someone into a monster.

Red’s favorite person in the world is probably her granny. Some people call Granny a witch, but Red knows that Granny does whatever she can to help others. She’s even tried to help Red control her own magic, but that usually doesn’t end well. When Granny gets sick, Red vows to do whatever she can to find a cure for Granny’s illness, something to ensure that Granny will live forever.

In her quest for a cure, Red meets another young girl searching for a magical elixir of her own. Goldie (better known to you and me as Goldilocks) is a hyper, chatty girl who Red finds annoying. Red tries to lose Goldie in the Woods, but a dangerous encounter brings the two girls together, and a rather unlikely friendship begins to form.

Now, the two girls are working together to find something that will help Granny. They enlist the assistance of a rather reluctant dwarf who leads them to some possible “cures.” But Red learns quickly that these magical cures come with a price, a price she may not be willing to pay…even if it means making Granny well again.

Throughout this quest, Red also finds herself growing closer to Wolf. She and this lonely animal share a special connection, and she soon realizes that he’s dealing with his own problems, namely a Huntsman who is feared above all others in the Woods. Red is familiar with the Huntsman and does not see him as a threat…until she and her friends get in his way.

Can Red, Goldie, and Wolf escape the trouble following them? What will they encounter along the way? Will Red be able to find what she needs to help her Granny and face her own fears in the process?

Forget what you think you know about Little Red Riding Hood and learn the real story when you read Red by Liesl Shurtliff!


If possible, I think I love Red even more than Rump. Red is an awesomely complicated character who shows enormous growth throughout the course of the book. She goes from a grumpy, annoyed loner frightened of her own magic to a slightly less grumpy friend who faces her fears and is confident in her abilities.

As if Red herself isn’t a big enough deal, don’t even get me started on all of the wonderful appearances from familiar characters. We have references to Goldilocks and the Three Bears (of course), as well as Snow White (who may not have been as beloved by the seven dwarves as previously thought), Rumpelstiltskin, Sleeping Beauty, and a fantastic twist on Beauty and the Beast. I’m sure there are more allusions, but I just can’t recall all of them right now. Suffice it to say, though, that readers will delight in making these connections, and they’ll learn that there may be more than one side to their favorite stories.

Red will be released to the masses next Tuesday, April 12th, and I’ve already got students asking me when we’ll have the book in the library. (I guess I’ll be making a run to the closest bookstore after school next Tuesday.) Most of those students have already read Rump, so I predict they’ll be equally–if not even more–charmed by Red, and they’ll probably want to know when to expect the next offering from Liesl Shurtliff. (I wish I had the answer to that question myself.)

For more information on Red and other works by Liesl Shurtliff, you can connect with the author on her website, TwitterFacebook, and Goodreads. Also, check out the Red book trailer below. It covers a couple of things that I kind of glossed over in this post…and it’s really well done!

Tell the Wind and Fire

On April 5th, Sarah Rees Brennan’s new book, Tell the Wind and Fire, will be released. Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read the book a little early, and I bring you my thoughts on this gripping fantasy today.

I began reading Tell the Wind and Fire in early March, and I have to admit that it took me quite some time to really get invested in the story. It wasn’t clear in the beginning what kind of world I was reading about. It took a while for me to figure out just what was going on in this futuristic, magic-infused version of New York. Truth be told, I’m still trying to work things out. The story did pick up, though, and the more I read, the more intrigued I was…and the more I saw our world reflected in the pages of this book.

The world is divided. Those who live in the Light enjoy wealth, luxury, and freedom. Those in the Dark are poor, hungry, and oppressed. Lucie Manette, born in the Dark, is part of both worlds, and she skirts a fine line between wanting to stay safe and knowing that things should be changed.

Lucie is a Light Magician. As such, she practices what is considered the most pure form of magic. She’s used her magic to save her father and earn a place in Light New York. She has a seemingly perfect boyfriend, Ethan, son of the most powerful family in the city, and, though some things weigh on her, life is going relatively well for Lucie.

Until it’s not.

A disturbing encounter on a train brings both Lucie and Ethan face-to-face with a secret that could tear both of their worlds apart. It is here that they meet Carwyn, a young man created with the Darkest of magic. He saves Ethan from a horrible fate…by revealing that he is Ethan’s doppelganger, a Dark Magician who could destroy Ethan and his entire family.

Carwyn’s sudden appearance begins a series of events that force both Lucie and Ethan to confront what’s really going on in the city…and what they must do to change things. But their action–or lack thereof–may not be enough to control the storm that is coming. Those in the Dark are determined to wage war, and they see Lucie as the face of their revolution. They’re determined to beat back the Light…at any cost.

What is Lucie to do? How can she possibly take on one more burden when she already feels overloaded by everything she’s done and the many secrets she’s keeping? Can she trust Carwyn to help her save Ethan–and many others–from a terrible fate? What is her connection to this Dark revolution, and can she use that connection to her advantage?

The Light and the Dark are at war in New York City, and Lucie must decide what she’s willing to do–and who she’s willing to sacrifice–to save those she loves. What will she ultimately decide? And how will that shape Lucie in the fight to come? Discover the truth for yourself when you read Tell the Wind and Fire by Sarah Rees Brennan.


According to the author’s note at the end of the book, Tell the Wind and Fire is a loose retelling of A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. I wish I had known that going in. I’m not a huge Dickens fan, but I may have read A Tale of Two Cities before starting this book if I had known of that connection. (I loathed Dickens in high school. I haven’t revisited his books as an adult. It may be time to change that. Maybe I’ll enjoy his work more now.) As it is, reading both books could lead to some interesting discussions and comparisons.

Tell the Wind and Fire definitely illuminates the differences between the haves and have-nots in any society. Unless you’re living under a rock, you know that this is something our society deals with daily. The “haves” keep getting more, can buy their way out of nearly anything, and enjoy a life of privilege. The “have-nots” are persecuted, blamed for their circumstances, feared, and oftentimes barely surviving. What’s more, those in power frequently do whatever they can to keep the have-nots at the bottom of the food chain, enacting laws and erecting walls that divide the world more than ever.

Am I talking about the book or the world today? Exactly.

This book is sure to start some lively discussions amongst its readers. It is violent, timely, and thought-provoking. I look forward to reading more and seeing how Lucie handles everything that happens and where it leads her. (I have no idea when we can expect a second book, but, given how Tell the Wind and Fire ended, I’m pretty confident that a sequel is coming.)

I would recommend Tell the Wind and Fire to YA and adult readers. It is extremely violent at times and deals with a politically turbulent society. Older readers, in my opinion, will appreciate the horrors and complexities in this book more than middle grade readers will.

If you’d like to learn more about Tell the Wind and Fire or other books by Sarah Rees Brennan, you can connect with the author on her website, Tumblr, and Twitter. You may also want to take a look at the book trailer below. It gives a bit more information about Tell the Wind and Fire and may explain things a bit better than I did.

Lady Midnight

Unless you are brand new to this blog, you know that I have a mild obsession with Cassandra Clare’s writing. Despite the current controversy (which I won’t go into here) and the less-than-spectacular movie and TV adaptations of her work, I remain a loyal fan. My enjoyment of her writing has only increased with her latest novel, Lady Midnight, the first book in the new Dark Artifices trilogy.

But before we move on to Lady Midnight, if you’re not already familiar with Clare’s Shadowhunter novels, you’ve got a bit of catching up to do. Read these books first:

For whatever reason, I neglected to write posts on City of Ashes or The Bane Chronicles. Trust me, they’re just as awesome as the other books. In the case of The Bane Chronicles, probably more awesome. (It’s no secret that the High Warlock of Brooklyn is my favorite character.)


Now, let’s turn our attention to Lady Midnight. Some may be a little shocked that I’m just now getting around to posting on this book, especially considering my love of Clare’s books. I promise I have very good reasons.

  1. I pre-ordered the book through Barnes & Noble, and it didn’t arrive at my house until March 11th, three days after the release date. (I can’t complain too much, though. I did get an autographed copy.)
  2. My school book fair kicked off on March 10th and didn’t wrap up until yesterday. If you’ve ever run an elementary school book fair, you know how exhausting it is. I barely had enough energy to read more than a couple of chapters before passing out each night.
  3. My Battle of the Books team has been preparing for competition. Our regionals were this past Tuesday, and I’m pleased to report that we’re moving on to finals next week.

Even with all of that going on, I did manage to finish Lady Midnight last night, and, like I expected, it made me want to weep, rage, and throw things. I mean that in the best possible way.

Lady Midnight takes place in Los Angeles and focuses primarily on Emma Carstairs and Julian Blackthorn. These parabatai live at the LA Institute with the younger Blackthorn children–Ty, Livvy, Dru, and Tavvy–their mostly absent uncle Arthur, and Cristina, a Shadowhunter visiting from Mexico (and possibly escaping her own past).

It’s been five years since the Dark War that took so many Shadowhunters from them, including Emma’s parents and Julian’s father, and time has molded both Emma and Julian into much more than the children they once were. Emma is bent on finding out what really happened to her parents, and Julian is doing everything he can to keep his family together while hiding his wealth of feelings from everyone around him.

When strange murders with possible demonic ties begin occurring in LA, Emma and Julian know they must investigate…but there’s a problem. Some of the victims are Faeries, and the Cold Peace prevents Shadowhunters from investigating crimes involving Faeries. That doesn’t exactly stop Emma and Julian, and the waters get even more muddied when a Faerie convoy arrives at the Institute with an incentive for the young Shadowhunters to provide assistance. In return for their help in capturing the killer and handing him/her over to the Fey, they’ll return Mark Blackthorn–half-Fey, half-Shadowhunter, member of the Wild Hunt, and Julian’s older brother–back to his family.

Mark’s sudden return to his family is an adjustment for everyone…most especially Mark. He struggles with what it means to be part of the human world once more. Part of him longs to return to the Wild Hunt…and what he left behind. Another part of him wants to contribute to his family, but so much has changed since he left. Where exactly does he fit?

As Mark is dealing with his own turmoil, so are Emma and Julian. Emma is certain that the odd murders in LA are somehow tied to her parents. She recklessly follows every lead she can, leading herself and others into more danger than they expected.

As for Julian, he’s finding it harder and harder to hold everything and everyone together. So much has been placed on his young shoulders, and he’s not sure how much more he can handle. Throw in the fact that he’s in love with Emma, his parabatai, and things get even more complicated.

Even as Emma and Julian grow closer together, closer than is allowed by Shadowhunter law, danger and betrayal are making their way toward the Los Angeles Institute and its inhabitants. Who will be left standing when all is said and done? What will be unleashed should these young Shadowhunters fail to stop the maniacal killer? What could it all mean for the Blackthorns and their closest allies?

Read Lady Midnight, the first book of The Dark Artifices, to learn the answers to these questions and many more…


Oh, I have left out sooooo much here. I didn’t even really touch on Cristina’s issues, Ty and how the Clave views those who are “different,” or the appearance of the “Lost Herondale.” I couldn’t possibly cover everything in one blog post, so I’m not even going to try. Suffice it to say that a LOT happens in the nearly 700 pages of this book, and everything is important.

If you’re also a Shadowhunter fan, you’ll be pleased to know that we do see some old favorites in Lady Midnight. Tessa, Jem, Magnus, Jace, Clary, and Church all make appearances, and I’m confident we’ll see more of them as the series progresses.

Speaking of the rest of the series, the next book, Lord of Shadows, is set to be released in May of 2017, and book three, The Queen of Air and Darkness will be out sometime in 2018. Long waits ahead, people.

If you’d like more information on Lady Midnight and all things Shadowhunter, visit Cassie Clare’s website, Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, and Mundie Moms. You may also want to check out the video below from Cassie herself.

That’s all from me for now. I hope you enjoy Lady Midnight as much as I did!

The Copper Gauntlet

Caution: If you haven’t read The Iron Trial, the first book in the Magisterium series by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare, do that before continuing with this post. Also, if it’s been over a year since you’ve read book one, give it a quick once-over before proceeding with The Copper Gauntlet. (I wish I had.)

I decided that my first book of the new year should be one that I’ve been meaning to get to for a while. Truthfully, I’m shocked at myself that I didn’t devour The Copper Gauntlet the minute it came out. (It’s no big secret that I’m a Cassandra Clare fangirl.) This second book in the Magisterium series was released on September 1st, and it’s been staring at me reproachfully from the top of my TBR pile ever since. Thankfully, I’ve now taken care of that little problem.

Since it had been a while since I read The Iron Trial (November 2014), I had forgotten much of what happened in that book. (I’m serious about doing a brief re-read before starting book two.) For that reason, it was a little difficult for my reading of The Copper Gauntlet to pick up momentum at first. Once I got into it, though–and was reminded of the events of the first book–things really got moving, and I was just as invested in this book as I was its predecessor.

Callum Hunt isn’t what one would call a normal kid. Sure, he’s spending the summer at home with his dad, playing with his dog, and getting ready for another school year, but that’s not exactly the whole story.

See, Call is about to enter his second year at the Magisterium, a school for mages, a school that his father absolutely loathes. Also, his dog is actually a Chaos-ridden wolf named Havoc, and this pet could do some serious damage if he really wanted to. Finally, Call might just be the vessel for the Enemy of Death (the big, bad guy in the world of mages). Yeah…Call threw “normal” out the window a while ago.

When Call discovers that his father has some disturbing, dangerous plans for both Call and Havoc, he runs away to the only home he has left…the Magisterium and the friends he’s made there. He finds refuge with his friends, Tamara and Aaron, but he doesn’t reveal his deep, dark secret to them. They wouldn’t understand the whole “I actually possess the soul of the Enemy” thing. Call barely understands it himself. There has to be more to him than he’s been led to believe, and he’ll do whatever he can to convince himself that he won’t turn out to be an Evil Overlord.

When the Alkahest–a powerful copper gauntlet–is stolen, Call knows it’s up to him to find this magical object and return it to the Magisterium. Why? Well, his father may have something to do with it, and Call needs to get to him before either the Magisterium or the minions of the Enemy do. (Also, the Alkahest could be used to destroy Call and his best friend, Aaron. No pressure there.)

Of course, Call can’t possibly get away without his friends and Havoc (plus one more kid he can’t stand), so he goes on the run with some company, and, as one might imagine, the group finds more trouble than they ever expected.

_______________

I’m going to stop before I give too much more away. I will tell you, however, that for every question answered in this book, dozens more pop up. There is some resolution at the end of The Copper Gauntlet, but, given that there are three more books to go in this series, we can deduce that it won’t last.

Speaking of future books, the next installment, The Bronze Key, is expected to be released in September of this year. Book four, The Golden Boy, will be out in 2017, and the final chapter, The Enemy of Death, is expected in 2018. Lots to look forward to.

Like The Iron Trial, I think The Copper Gauntlet is a great read for those in upper elementary grades on up. Fans of Harry Potter and Rick Riordan’s books will delight in this series…and will surely make some interesting comparisons. (The similarities between The Magisterium and Harry Potter are undeniable.) I added this book to my own elementary library collection, and the response has been nothing but positive.

For more information on The Iron Trial, The Copper Gauntlet, and the rest of the Magisterium series, visit the official website. It’s got lots of interactive goodies that you may enjoy.

Now, I must leave you. (Not for long, so no worries.) I return to the “real world” tomorrow, and I have one day left to do all the stuff that I meant to do during my two week break. I can hardly contain my joy.*

*Where’s a sarcasm font when I need one?

Carry On

If you’ve read Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, you’ve already been introduced to the characters of Simon Snow and Baz Grimm-Pitch. These two characters are the subjects of Cath’s fanfiction in Fangirl. In Carry On, Rowell graciously gives readers the story Cath was working on. Now, it’s not totally necessary for you to read Fangirl to follow what’s happening in Carry On, but I do think it helps.

*I hope the paragraph above makes sense. It does if you’ve read Fangirl. It may not if you haven’t. Of course, it’s pretty easy to remedy that situation.*

Simon Snow is, by all accounts, the Chosen One. It doesn’t seem to matter that his magic is unreliable at best and totally explosive at worst. The leader of all mages–called the Mage, obviously–is sure that Simon will save the World of Mages. Simon isn’t all that convinced. (Neither is his roommate, Baz.)

Simon is starting his final year at the Watford School for Magicks, and he’s fairly certain that he’ll have to battle the Insidious Humdrum, the strange figure who’s creating holes in the magical world, at some point this year. (Simon has no clue how he’s supposed to win against this guy.) He’s also worried that he and Baz are probably going to end up killing each other. That is, if Baz ever shows up.

When the new school term begins, Baz is nowhere to be found, and Simon becomes obsessed with figuring out what’s happened. There’s simply no way Baz would voluntarily miss his final year at Watford…or any chance to torture Simon. Does his disappearance have something to do with the Humdrum or the increasing negative feelings about the Mage? Could it be related to Baz being a vampire (which he has never actually admitted to Simon)? Or could something more be going on? Whatever’s happening, Simon needs to know where Baz is…and what he’s up to.

Soon, though, Simon has one less thing to worry about. Baz returns to Watford. Why was he gone? Well, that’s sort of complicated.

“Complicated” is the perfect word to describe nearly everything about Baz’s life. He’s a vampire, he’s returning from being kidnapped, he’s trying to find out who killed his mom, his infuriating roommate has more magic than anyone in the world (but doesn’t really know what to do with it), his family is working against the Mage, and…oh, yeah…he’s in love with Simon. How could he possibly fall for someone he doesn’t like most of the time and may have to destroy in the near future? Well, the heart wants what the heart wants…

Eventually, Simon and Baz realize that they’ll have to form a truce and join forces to discover what’s really going on in the World of Mages…with the Mage, the Humdrum, all of it. Can these two work together without killing each other? Will Baz reveal his feelings for Simon? How does Simon truly feel about Baz? Is there hope for the future when the World of Mages is in so much turmoil?

Only one thing is certain: It’s going to be a very interesting year at Watford.

_______________

I love this book so hard. (This is true for every Rainbow Rowell book I’ve read.) The dialogue is compelling, the mysteries are intriguing, and the characters are wonderfully complex. And I haven’t even mentioned the delightful love story…

Those who’ve read Fangirl (or any of this post) likely already know that Carry On features a developing relationship between Simon and Baz. This is commonly known as slash fic, and is very popular in fanfiction writing. If you ever wanted Harry Potter to end up with Draco Malfoy instead of Ginny Weasley, definitely give Carry On a try. It’s a very sweet love story, but there’s enough danger, magic, drama, and even humor to satisfy all readers (even those who don’t particularly like slash fiction).

As I wrap this post up, I realize that I haven’t begun to express just how wonderful Carry On really is. I don’t know if I can. Read it for yourself. Hopefully, you’ll love it as much as I do.

If you’d like more information on Carry On and other books by the absolutely fabulous Rainbow Rowell, check out the author’s website or connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram. You may also want to check out the video below. It features Rainbow Rowell herself talking about Carry On at Book Expo America.