Lying Out Loud

Several weeks ago, I read The DUFF, a highly entertaining read by Kody Keplinger. This past Tuesday, I finished its companion novel, Lying Out Loud. (Normally, it doesn’t take me so long to write up a post after finishing a book. I blame end-of-school-year craziness.)

Anyway, Lying Out Loud, which takes place a few years after the conclusion of The DUFF, revolves around Amy Rush (Wesley’s sister) and her best friend, Sonny Ardmore. The best way I can describe their story is Easy A meets Cyrano de Bergerac. But since that doesn’t really go into how cool this book is, let’s take a closer look…

Sonny Ardmore is a world-class liar. She’s discovered that sometimes lies–especially those concerning her parents–are much less painful than the truth. Not even her best friend Amy knows exactly why Sonny needs to sleep over every single night…and Sonny’s in no real hurry to tell her. Sonny knows Amy would by sympathetic, but telling the truth would mean admitting what’s really going on to herself, and Sonny’s not ready for that.

So…the lying continues, and it’s about to land Sonny–and Amy–into quite a mess.

Ryder Cross is the new kid at Hamilton High. He’s pretentious, standoffish, and totally drool-worthy. And he has a crush on Amy. One night, Sonny and Amy (mostly Sonny) respond to a message from Ryder and basically play him for a fool. When Ryder calls them out on how mean they’ve been, Sonny responds and apologizes. The two end up chatting all night long, revealing pieces of themselves they’ve never shared with anyone else. There’s just one big problem, though. Ryder thinks he’s talking to Amy.

When Sonny realizes that there’s been a mix-up, she initially tries to tell Ryder the truth, but he loathes her and won’t give her a chance to fess up. So, liar that she is, Sonny decides to enlist Amy’s help in turning things around. She convinces her best friend to do everything she can to make Ryder let go of his ridiculous crush and turn his attentions to Sonny.

All the while, Sonny continues to text Ryder all the time–and he still thinks he’s talking to Amy. Sonny knows it’s wrong, but she can’t give up this tenuous connection to Ryder. She tells him things she’s told no one else, and he’s doing the same. Sonny just wishes he’d realize that the girl Ryder’s talking to is right in front of him, waiting to be noticed.

Ryder is very confused about the whole situation, and he’s not the only one. Amy is growing tired of Sonny’s schemes, and even Sonny is having trouble keeping up with all of her lies in her quest to prevent the messy truth of her life from being revealed. But that’s the thing about truth. It has a way of making itself known no matter what a person does…and Sonny’s day of reckoning is fast approaching.

Sonny does everything she can think of–short of being totally honest–to unravel the mess she’s made, but her lies are catching up to her. She’s totally panicked, and she’s terrified that she’s about to lose Ryder, Amy, and any possible hope for her own future.

What will happen when Sonny is forced to face the truth? Have her lies hopelessly damaged her relationships with both Amy and Ryder? And how will Sonny and those closest to her deal with the circumstances that led Sonny to make her life one big lie in the first place?

Uncover the truth for yourself when you read Lying Out Loud by Kody Keplinger!

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Lying Out Loud is a quick, fun, sometimes serious, and always charming read that fans of The DUFF will adore. Readers will especially enjoy the glimpses of Wesley and Bianca in this story. (He’s still charming, she’s still sarcastic, and they’re still really cute together.)

One thing that really stood out to me about this book was that it was just as much about Sonny’s relationship with Amy as it was about her burgeoning romance with Ryder. In fact, I daresay the Sonny/Amy relationship was the most important in the book. If it had come down to choosing between Amy and Ryder, I honestly think Sonny would have chosen to keep Amy in her life. (I’m glad it didn’t come to that, though.) Sonny was kind of horrible to Amy for much of the book, but Amy stood by her side–until even she couldn’t take the lying anymore. When Sonny realized that she was about to lose the greatest person in her life, that’s when she really turned things around. I don’t think Ryder alone would have been able to be that catalyst for change (though he definitely had a part in it).

I think Lying Out Loud is a great read for young adults looking for a book that really delves into relationships–friendships, family (with all of their complications), adversaries, and even one girl’s relationship with herself. Sonny examines her own part in the relationships around her, especially her tendency to lie in an effort to make things easier for her, and I think she eventually realizes just how much she matters to those who really care for her and how much damage she’s truly done. The lies are not necessary. Those who really love her will do so no matter how bad or ugly the truth may happen to be.

If I’ve piqued your interest with this post and you’d like to learn more about Lying Out Loud and other books by Kody Keplinger, check out the author on her website, Twitter, TumblrFacebook, Instagram, Goodreads, and YouTube. Have fun!

The Doubt Factory

Thanks to a much-needed beach vacation, I was able to finish reading The Doubt Factory, a new YA thriller from Paolo Bacigalupi, this weekend. I read this book thanks to NetGalley, but you can read it in just a few weeks. It is scheduled for an October 14th release.

If you’re something of a conspiracy nut (like me), The Doubt Factory will confirm everything you’ve ever believed…and give you a few more things to induce paranoia. For those who are on the optimistic side…well, this book should take care of that.

Alix Banks has a pretty decent life. Big house, nice car, semi-attentive parents, the best education. But what’s the cost of all the good stuff in Alix’s life? Alix knows her father is involved in some fairly heavy-duty PR work, but she doesn’t really pay much attention to how Daddy dearest “brings home the bacon.” All that is about to change…

When someone known only as 2.0 enters Alix’s life, she is oddly intrigued at first. This mysterious–and strangely compelling–figure wants Alix to pay closer attention to her dad’s work…but why? Why would this character, believed to be a petty vandal, be interested in Alix’s father?

Alix is curious, and her curiosity eventually leads her into a dangerous game of truth, deception, and corporate greed. 2.0–better known as Moses–and his merry band of activists attempt to open Alix’s eyes to her father’s shady business dealings. They know that he spends his days covering up what “fine, upstanding companies” don’t want revealed–side effects of medications, carcinogens in household products, wrongful deaths, etc. Alix’s father sells doubt. He–and those like him–finesse their government contacts, throw money at problems, mire the legal system in pointless paperwork and delays…all for the purpose at casting doubt on the claims of those would endanger the all-important profit margin.

At first, Alix refuses to believe everything she’s being told. She’s sure her father is incapable of such heinous acts. She reveals what she knows about 2.0 to her dad and his security team…and she almost immediately regrets it. Deep down, she knows her dad is hiding something, and she makes it her business to find the truth.

Alix becomes obsessed with her father’s company, and she is disgusted by what she uncovers. Moses was telling the truth. But what can Alix do to change things? And can she convince Moses to help her when she turned her back on him once before? Can a couple of teenagers take down something as big as the Doubt Factory, and is Alix willing to betray her father, a man who loved and raised her, for the sake of the truth?

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*Spoilers ahead!*

Even though I found The Doubt Factory to be a gripping thrill-ride of a book, I will admit that one thing did bother me: Alix’s relationship with Moses. There was a fair amount of Stockholm Syndrome happening here, in my opinion. The girl fell in love with her stalker/kidnapper! Sure, it worked out for Belle in Beauty and the Beast, but this is no Disney fairy tale. What kind of message does this send? “It’s okay, girls. I know that creepy guy follows you around, bugs your house, drugs you, and keeps you locked in a cage, but he’s a really great guy once you get to know him.” I know that Moses had his reasons for doing what he did, but Alix’s reaction to him felt wrong to me. Even when she discovered he was telling the truth about everything, she was a little too willing to forgive the whole kidnapping thing. That definitely would have been a deal-breaker for me.

Despite that one glaring issue, I did enjoy The Doubt Factory. I’m a little wary of eating, drinking, breathing, cleaning, taking my meds, or doing anything else after reading it, but maybe a dose of paranoia is a good thing. Keeps me on my toes and aware of what’s going on around me. I can definitely say that this book made me want to do a bit more research on the things I put into my body, especially medications. The Doubt Factory was eye-opening to say the least.

The Doubt Factory is ideally suited to high schools with strong business programs. This book would be an interesting read in business classes and could illicit some interesting discussions of ethics, honesty, government involvement in commerce, FDA regulations, whistle-blowing and its aftereffects, and many other issues.

For those of you wondering if you should add The Doubt Factory to your library or classroom collections, let me give this recommendation. This book is a great addition to libraries and classrooms that serve older YA populations (high school age and up). There is some profanity, sexual situations, violence, and criminal activity. Not to mention all the chemical, legal, and corporate mumbo-jumbo. I just don’t think this is a book that most younger readers will appreciate.

If you’d like more information on The Doubt Factory and author Paolo Bacigalupi, click here. You can also connect with the author on Facebook, Twitter, or Goodreads.